Department of English

Current Faculty

Jennifer L. Andersen, Professor
B.A. 1988, University of California, Los Angeles
M.A. 1991, Ph.D. 1996, Yale University
Mary Boland, Professor
B.A. 1984, State University of New York, Albany
M.A. 1996, Ph.D. 2002, University of Rochester
David Carlson, Chair
B.A. 1992, Colgate University
M.A. 1994, Ph.D. 2000, Indiana University
Alexandra Cavallaro, Assistant Professor
B.A. 2008, Kutztown University Of Pennsylvania
M.A. 2009, Ph.D. 2015, University Of Illinois, Urbana
Rong Chen, Professor
B.A. 1979, Xian Foreign Language Institute
M.A. 1986, Ph.D. 1990, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana
Kimberly A. Costino, Professor, Director of the Teaching Resource Center
B.A. 1993, Ursinus College
M.A. 1996, Villanova University
Ph.D. 2002, University of Massachusetts
Cynthia Cotter, Lecturer
B.A. 1983, M.A. 1991, California State University, San Bernardino
Parastou Feiz, Professor
B.A. 1998, Shahid Beheshti University, Iran
M.A. 2002, Ph.D. 2007, Pennsylvania State University
Miriam Fernandez , Assistant Professor
B.A. 2007, University of California, Los Angeles
M.A. 2013, California State University, Fresno
Ph.D. 2018, Washington State University
Thomas Girshin, Associate Professor
B.A. 2003, University of Albany
M.A. 2006, Binghamton University
Ph D. 2012, Binghamton University
Holly Henry, Professor
B.A. 1987, M.A. 1992, Bucknell University
Ph.D. 1999, Pennsylvania State University
Sung-Heh Hyon, Professor, Chair
B.A. 1989, University of California, San Diego
Ph.D. 1995, University of Michigan
Jasmine Lee, Assistant Professor
B.A. 2008, UC San Diego
M.A. 2011, Cal State San Bernardino
Ph.D. 2018, UC Irvine
Jessica Luck, Professor
B.A. 1996, M.S. 1997, University of Tennessee
M.A. 1999, Wake Forest University
Ph.D. 2006, Indiana University
Chad Luck, Associate Professor
B.A. 1994, University of Washington
M.A. 2001, Ph.D. 2006, Indiana University
David Marshall, Professor, Assistant Dean
B.A. 1993, College of the Holy Cross
M.A. 1998, University of York
Ph.D. 2007, Indiana University
Vanessa Ovalle Perez, Assistant Professor
B.A. 2010, Cornell University
M.A. 2017, University of Southern California
Ph D. 2019, University of Southern California
Julie Paegle, Professor
B.S. 1996, B.A. 1997, M.F.A. 2000, Ph.D. 2006, University of Utah
Yumi Pak, Assistant Professor
B.A. 2004, M.A. 2009, University of California, Santa Cruz
Ph.D. 2012, University of California, San Diego
Angela Penaredondo, Assistant Professor
B.A. 2007, San Francisco State
M.F.A. 2013, University of California, Riverside
Jason Magabo Perez , Assistant Professor
B.A., 2003, University of California, San Diego
M.F.A., 2006, New College of California
Ph.D. 2016, University of California, San Diego
Luz Ramirez, Professor
B.A. 1991, Tulane University
M.A. 1994, Ph.D. 1998, University of Texas, Austin
Karen Rowan, Associate Professor
B.A. 1996, Guilford College
Ph.D. 2005, State University of New York at Albany
DeShea R. Rushing, Lecturer
B.A. 1981, California State University, Long Beach
M.A. 1983, California State University, San Bernardino
M.F.A. 2013, Western Connecticut State University
J. Chad Sweeney, Assistant Professor
B.A. 1993, University of Oklahoma Norman Campus
M.F.A. 2006, California State University, San Francisco
Ph.D. 2011, Western Michigan University
Caroline H. Vickers, Professor
B.A. 1994, University of Georgia
M.S. 1997, Georgetown University
Ph.D. 2004, University of Arizona

Emeriti

James Brown, Professor
J. Milton Clark
Juan Delgado, Professor
Margaret S. Doane, Professor
Bertram Fairchild, Jr., Professor
Ellen Gil-Gomez, Professor
Bruce Golden, Professor
Charles V. Hartung, Associate Professor
Carol P. Haviland, Professor
Robert A. Lee, Professor
Loralee MacPike, Professor
Clark Mayo, Professor
Susan Meisenhelder, Professor
Theron Pace, Professor
E. Phillip Page, Professor
Elinore H. Partridge, Associate Professor
Renee Pigeon, Professor
B.A. 1978, University of California, Santa Barbara
M.A. 1984, Ph.D. 1988, University of California, Los Angeles
Jacqueline R. Rhodes, Professor
Treadwell Ruml, II, Professor
Peter R. Schroeder, Professor
Wendy Smith, Professor
Edward M. White, Professor
Salaam Y. Yousif, Professor

Courses

ENG 1000. Academic Speaking for Multilingual Students. Units: 3

Analysis and practice of spoken language in university settings, such as classroom discussions, laboratories, office hours, and other interactions. Builds students' understanding of and fluency in such areas as intonation patterns, grammatical structures, and discourse strategies for particular academic situations. Formerly offered as Eng 100.

ENG 1050A. Stretch Composition I. Units: 3

Analysis and use of strategies for conducting research and critically reading and writing expository texts. Explores relationships among language, meaning, and context, and emphasizes writing as a recursive process and as a means of critical thinking. Students identify themselves for placement in this course through Directed Self-Placement. Students will remain with the same cohort of classmates in the same time slot across ENG 1050A -ENG 1060A. Graded Credit/No Credit. Formerly offered as Eng 105A.

ENG 1050B. Stretch Composition I for Multilingual Students. Units: 3

Analysis and use of strategies for conducting research and critically reading and writing expository texts. Explores relationships among language, meaning, and context, and emphasizes writing as a recursive process and as a means of critical thinking. Students identify themselves for placement in this course through Directed Self-Placement and through self-identification as a speaker of a native or home language other than English. Students who meet these two criteria may also opt to take ENG 1050A instead of ENG 1050B. Students will remain with the same cohort of classmates in the same time slot across ENG 1050B -ENG 1060B. Graded Credit/No Credit. Formerly offered as Eng 105B.

ENG 1060A. Stretch Composition II. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 1050A. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 105A
Further examination of how written language functions in context. Builds students' abilities to conduct research and to integrate it into their own arguments. Students will remain with the same cohort of classmates in the same time slot across ENG 1050A - ENG 1060A. Graded A through C-/No Credit. A grade of C- or better fulfills GE Category A2. Formerly offered as ENG 106A.

ENG 1060B. Stretch Composition II for Multilingual Students. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 1050B. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 105B
Further examination of how written language functions in context. Builds students' abilities to conduct research and to integrate it into their own arguments. Students will remain with the same cohort of classmates in the same time slot across ENG 1050B - ENG 1060B. Graded A through C-/No Credit. A grade of C- or better fulfills GE Category A2. Formerly offered as ENG 106B.

ENG 1070A. First-Year Composition. Units: 3

Concentrated composition course for advanced first-year writers. Examines the ways written language functions in various contexts. Requires students to conduct research, to draw upon their critical readings of texts to develop their own arguments, and to examine and use rhetorical strategies that respond to different situations. Students identify themselves for placement in this course through Directed Self-Placement. Graded A through C-/No Credit. A grade of C- or better satisfies GE Category A2. Formerly offered as ENG 107.

ENG 1070B. First-Year Composition for Multilingual Students. Units: 3

Concentrated composition course for advanced first-year writers. Examines the ways written language functions in various contexts. Requires students to conduct research, to draw upon their critical readings of texts to develop their own arguments, and to examine and use rhetorical strategies that respond to different situations. Students identify themselves for placement in this course through Directed Self-Placement and through self-identification as a speaker of a native or home language other than English. Students who meet these criteria may also opt to take ENG 1070A instead of ENG 1070B. Graded A through C-/No Credit. A grade of C- or better satisfies GE Category A2. Formerly offered as ENG 107.

ENG 1120. Speculative Fiction: Science Fiction, Horror, Fantasy. Units: 3

Reading and analysis of speculative fiction in its historical and cultural contexts, with emphasis on critical reading and writing. Genres may include but are not limited to science fiction, fantasy, and horror, either individually or in combination. Satisfies GE category C2. May be taken for up to 9 units as topics change, only three credits of which can be used for GE.

ENG 1200. Multi-Ethnic American Literature. Units: 3

Introduction to literary works produced by individuals of African American, Asian American, Chicanx/Latinx, or Native American heritage, with an emphasis on literary, historical, and cultural context. Satisfies GE category C2; DI designation. May be taken for up to 9 units, only three of which can be used for GE.

ENG 1210. Diversity Literature and Social Justice. Units: 3

Introduction to literary works that reflect diversity, especially of race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, class, or culture, with an emphasis on how literature can respond to questions of social justice, equity, and human rights. Satisfies GE category C2; DI designation; WI designation. May be taken for up to 9 units as topics change, only three of which can be used for GE.

ENG 1300. Foundation Seminar: Language, Society, and Power. Units: 3

Seminar on roles that language plays in personal relationships and in such aspects of society as politics, law, technology, religion, and consumer culture. Emphasizes the power of language to influence, control, and inspire change through various genres and media. Attends to analytical and research strategies critical for students' success in academic, social, and personal settings. Satisfies GE category E; WI designation.

ENG 1700. Studies in Literature and Creative Writing. Units: 3

Quarter Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement or equivalent
Analysis and production of the forms and content of literature. Emphasis placed on methodologies of reading and writing fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry and drama for various media and performance contexts. Satisfies GE category C2; DI designation. Formerly offered as ENG 170.

ENG 2000. Introduction to English Studies. Unit: 1

Introduction to the sub-disciplines in English, including literature, creative writing, linguistics, and rhetoric and writing studies. Orients students to various dimensions of English Studies, the goals of the English B.A., and possible career pathways for English majors. Graded credit/no credit.

ENG 2100. Historical Approaches to English Literature. Units: 3

Quarter Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement or equivalent
Historically framed readings in English literature from the Middle Ages to the 18th Century. Formerly English 210.

ENG 2180. The Function of Stories. Units: 3

Examination of the role of stories and storytelling in human societies. Reading and analysis of multidisciplinary theories of the rise of storytelling in the human species and of narrative texts (both film and written) that reflect on the roles stories play in our lives. Satisfies GE category C2.

ENG 2250. Historical Approaches to American Literature. Units: 3

Historically framed readings in American literature. Formerly ENG 325.

ENG 2300. Historical Approaches to British Literature. Units: 3

Historically framed readings in nineteenth- and twentieth-century British literature to the present. Formerly ENG 212.

ENG 2400. Writing in the Public Sphere. Units: 3

Consideration of how writers use texts (including visual, digital, and print media) to represent public issues and effect public action. Emphasizes the social and material aspects of public writing and public rhetorics, and includes practice in writing for the public sphere. Satisfies GE designation WI only. Formerly ENG 240.

ENG 2500. Introduction to Creative Writing Studies. Units: 3

Introduction to the reading and writing of multiple genres, such as fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Emphasis on creative writing process, including reading works by established authors and drafting, reading, discussing, and revising original works by students.

ENG 3000. Studies in Global Literatures. Units: 3

Study of literatures from diverse regions around the world with an emphasis on their emergence in and circulation beyond specific local contexts. Considers how global literatures are shaped by various historical and social processes driving conflict, connectivity, and cross-cultural exchange. Satisfies GE category C4; DI designation; G designation; WI designation. Satisfies World Cultures and Diversity Pathway. Satisfies Global Connections Pathway.

ENG 3010. Analysis of Poetry and Drama. Units: 3

A literary analysis of both poetry and drama with special emphasis on how to write effectively about these forms of literature. Satisfies GE Writing Intensive designation (WI). Formerly ENG 301B.

ENG 3030. Analysis of Fiction and Nonfiction Prose. Units: 3

A literary analysis of both fiction and nonfiction prose with special emphasis on how to write effectively about these forms of literature. Satisfies GE Writing Intensive designation (WI). Formerly ENG 303B.

ENG 3060. Writing as Academic Inquiry. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Written Communication (A2) GE Category. Quarter Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement and a minimum of 90 quarter (60 semester) units of college credit
In this writing-intensive course, students will gain a deeper and more conscious sense of the possibilities of academic inquiry, how disciplinary knowledge is created, and the role of language and writing in inquiry and knowledge making. Through critical reading, writing, and research, students will participate in academic conversation, intersectional inquiry, and explore both the contexts of and the genres within those conversations, as well as consider the ethical responsibility of participating in knowledge-making processes. Revision, rewriting, and collaboration are key components of this course. All majors welcome. Satisfies GE designation WI. Formerly ENG 306.

ENG 3061. Science Writing as Academic Inquiry. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the Written Communication, A2 and Critical Thinking, A3 GE categories and a minimum of 60 semester, 90 quarter, units of college credit
This writing intensive course focuses on writing in and about the natural sciences. Students will gain a deeper and more conscious sense of both the possibilities of scientific inquiry and the role of language and writing in scientific inquiry and knowledge-making. Through reading, discussion, writing, and research, students will explore, analyze, and write within a variety of science-related genres, including formal scientific writing (e.g., research and review papers, proposals), as well as those used by scientists to communicate with the general public. Revision, rewriting, and collaboration are key components of the course. This course will also consider the complexities of information creation and dissemination as they relate to the natural sciences. Satisfies GE designation WI only. Formerly NSCI 306/3066 and ENG 306/3066; students may not earn credit for more than one of these courses. Graded A through C-/no credit.

ENG 3070. Theories of Public and Professional Writing. Units: 3

Quarter Prerequisite: Upper-division writing requirement or consent of instructor
Introduction to theoretical and rhetorical frameworks for public and professional writing and practice in developing writing projects. Satisfies GE designation WI only. Formerly Eng 307.

ENG 3110. Introduction to Linguistics. Units: 3

Overview of key concepts and methods of linguistics, as applied to the English language. Explores a variety of linguistic areas, such as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, and language acquisition. Formerly offered as ENG 311.

ENG 3140. Native American and Indigenous Literatures. Units: 3

A consideration of the oral traditions and literary works of diverse tribal nations. This course specifically attends to the historical, political, and cultural contexts of Native American creative expression. Satisfies GE category C4; DI designation; WI designation. Satisfies World Cultures and Diversity Pathway. Formerly offered as ENG 314.

ENG 3150. Studies in a Literary Genre. Units: 3

Intensive study of a selected genre. May be repeated for up to 15 units as topics change.

ENG 3190. Studies in Literary Diversity. Units: 3

Intensive study of literature which reflects diversity, especially of race, gender, sexual orientation, class or culture. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Formerly ENG 319.

ENG 3200. Literature for Children and Young Adults. Units: 3

Analysis of, and approaches to, literature for children, adolescents and young adults; emphasis on genre conventions, literary and cultural aspects, and methods for evaluating, selecting and teaching books for readers from preschool through YA age. Formerly ENG 320.

ENG 3210. Language, Thought, and Culture. Units: 3

Investigation of the interconnectness of language, thought, and culture. Using a cross-linguistic, cross-cultural approach, examines how language both shapes and reflects thought and cultural practice. Satisfies GE designation WI.

ENG 3220. English Grammar. Units: 3

Study and analysis of grammatical structures of English, focusing on their forms, meanings, and uses. Formerly offered as ENG 420.

ENG 3230. Chicana/o Literature. Units: 3

Selected literature by and about Mexican Americans. Emphasis on the uniqueness of the voices that collectively define Chicana/o literature and on the formal and thematic characteristics of that literature. Formerly ENG 323.

ENG 3240. Studies in Literary Topics. Units: 3

Study of a selected topic in literature. Satisfies GE designation WI. May be taken 5 times for credit as topics change. Formerly ENG 324.

ENG 3250. Asian American Literature. Units: 3

Selected literature by and about Asian Americans. Emphasis on the uniqueness of the voices that collectively define Asian American literature and on the formal and thematic characteristics of Asian American texts.

ENG 3260. Caribbean Literature. Units: 3

Selected literature by and about Caribbean people. Emphasis on the uniqueness of the voices that collectively define Caribbean literature and on the formal and thematic characteristics of Caribbean texts.

ENG 3290. Introduction to Literacy and Writing Studies. Units: 3

Examination of literacy as a historically and socially mediated set of values and practices, with specific consideration of how literacy functions in specific communities. Introduces students to related theories of writing and language use. Formerly ENG 329.

ENG 3300. Tutoring Writing: Theory and Practice. Units: 3

Quarter Prerequisite: satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement or equivalent and GE upper-division writing (F) requirement; or consent of instructor
Study of theories and methods for tutoring writing in college, secondary schools, and community contexts. Those completing this course with a grade of "B" or better are eligible to participate in campus writing tutoring programs. Satisfies GE designation WI only. Formerly ENG 330.

ENG 3310. Child Language and Literacy Development. Units: 3

Examination of how children acquire language and literacy. Attends to linguistic, cognitive, and social factors shaping children's acquisition processes.

ENG 3320. Second Language Acquisition. Units: 3

Examination of linguistic, psychological, and social aspects of second language acquisition. Considers implications for second language teaching. Formerly ENG 312.

ENG 3330. Myth and Epic. Units: 3

Myths and epics as they appear in folklore and classical literature, emphasizing their relationship to later Western literature. Formerly 333.

ENG 3350. Studies in the Novel. Units: 3

Studies in the novel with emphasis on close reading of specific texts. Formerly ENG 335.

ENG 3360. Women Writers. Units: 3

Literary analysis of selected works by women writers, with special emphasis on historical and contemporary issues in women's lives. Formerly 336.

ENG 3390. African American Literature. Units: 3

Selected literature by and about African Americans. Emphasis on the uniqueness of the voices that collectively define African American literature from the oral tradition to the present and on the formal and thematic characteristics of African American texts. Formerly ENG 339.

ENG 3400. Analysis of Environmental Discourse. Units: 3

Analysis of contemporary arguments related to sustainability, environmental justice, and global climate change issues. Examines how political, popular, cultural, and academic discourses in writing and in film shape environmental consciousness and inform attitudes towards, and participation in, environmental advocacy and activism. Satisfies GE category C4; G designation; WI designation. Satisfies Environmental Sustainability Pathway.

ENG 3410. Environmental Literature. Units: 3

Intensive study of environmental literature. Emphasis on critical consideration of environmental themes, issues, and concerns treated within literary works across historical periods, aesthetic movements, geographical regions, and genres. Satisfies GE category C4; G designation; WI designation. Satisfies Environmental Sustainability Pathway.

ENG 3470. Writing for Performance. Units: 3

Students acquire the essential creative writing skills for dramatic storytelling. Classroom exercises will culminate in students writing scripts for stage productions and dramatic texts for digital and multi-media production.

ENG 3500. Literary Movements: Aesthetics and Craft. Units: 3

Intensive study of varying approaches to the reading and writing of prose, poetry, and related literary genres. Emphasis on narrative and poetic theories, techniques, and strategies to help students define their own sensibilities within larger creative writing communities. Satisfies GE designation WI only.

ENG 3510. History of the English Language. Units: 3

Study of the development of the English language from its beginnings to the present. Examines changes in English grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation within historical contexts. Formerly ENG 422.

ENG 3600. Studies in Writing. Units: 3

Quarter Prerequisite: Upper-division writing requirement or consent of instructor
Study of a selected topic in writing studies. May be taken for up to 6 units as topics change. Formerly Eng 308.

ENG 3610. Studies in Literacy. Units: 3

Study of a selected topic in literacy studies. May be taken for up to 6 units as topics change.

ENG 3620. Studies in Rhetoric. Units: 3

Study of a selected topic in rhetoric studies. May be taken for up to 6 units as topics change.

ENG 3700. Turning Points in Literary History. Units: 3

Seminar on the perception and expression of major cultural transitions through imaginative literature. Explores literature not only as a record of the impact of big ideas, but also as an agent for communicating innovative thought and changing culture and values. Satisfies GE category C4; WI designation. Satisfies Big Ideas that Changed the World Pathway.

ENG 3750. Studies in Literary Theory. Units: 3

Survey of major issues in literary theory. Formerly ENG 385.

ENG 3991. Community Service Project. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or departmental approval of a written application submitted in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: Departmental approval of a written application submitted in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken
Application of previously learned skills in the area of English to academically related tasks in such agencies as governmental, social services and educational institutions. May be taken for up to 6 units of community service project credit. Graded credit/no credit. Formerly ENG 399A.

ENG 3992. Community Service Project. Units: 2

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or departmental approval of a written application submitted in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken
Application of previously learned skills in the area of English to academically related tasks in such agencies as governmental, social services and educational institutions. May be taken for up to 6 units of community service project credit. Graded credit/no credit. Formerly ENG 399B.

ENG 3993. Community Service Project. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or departmental approval of a written application submitted in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken
Credit for applying previously learned skills in the area of English to academically related tasks in such agencies as governmental, social services and educational institutions. May be taken for up to 6 units of community service project credit. Graded credit/no credit.

ENG 4010. English Literature of the Middle Ages. Units: 3

Lyric, drama, prose and verse narrative from the beginnings of English literature through Malory. Formerly ENG 401.

ENG 4030. English Literature of the Tudor/Stuart Era. Units: 3

Poetry, prose and drama from the Tudor and Stuart eras. Formerly ENG 403.

ENG 4060. Seventeenth Century Literature. Units: 3

English prose and poetry from Bacon through Milton. Formerly ENG 406.

ENG 4090. English Literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Units: 3

English poetry and prose of the Restoration and eighteenth century. Formerly ENG 409.

ENG 4120. Romantic Literature. Units: 3

Close study of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British Romanticism, broadly conceived, with attention to major Romantic writers and relevant cultural contexts. Formerly ENG 412.

ENG 4150. Victorian Literature. Units: 3

Close study of Victorian literature and culture including major authors. Formerly ENG 415.

ENG 4170. Poetry Writing Workshop. Units: 3

Workshop in poetry writing; discussion of student writing and exemplary texts by established poets. May be taken for up to 6 units of credit. Formerly ENG 417.

ENG 4180. Fiction Writing Workshop. Units: 3

Workshop in fiction writing; discussion of student writing and exemplary texts by established fiction writers. May be taken for up to 6 units of credit. Formerly ENG 418.

ENG 4400. Studies in a Literary Period or Movement. Units: 3

Intensive study of literature within historical and/or cultural contexts. May be taken for up to 15 units as topics change. Formerly ENG 440.

ENG 4410. Studies in a Major Authors. Units: 3

Intensive study of a selected author or authors. May be repeated for up to 15 units as topics change. Formerly ENG 441.

ENG 4420. Modern Poetry. Units: 3

Poetry in English from the late nineteenth century to World War II. Formerly ENG 442.

ENG 4430. Contemporary Poetry. Units: 3

Poetry in English from World War II to the present. Formerly ENG 443.

ENG 4470. Modern Fiction. Units: 3

Fiction in English from 1900 through World War II. Formerly ENG 447.

ENG 4480. Contemporary Fiction. Units: 3

Fiction in English from World War II to the present. Formerly ENG 448.

ENG 4630. Advanced Studies in Literary Topics. Units: 3

Advanced study of a topic in literature. May be taken again for credit as topics change. Formerly ENG 463.

ENG 4750. Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama. Units: 3

Study of the comedies, histories, tragedies and late romances of Shakespeare in the context of Renaissance drama. Formerly ENG 475.

ENG 5010. Media Performance Practicum. Units: 3

Quarter Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Practical application of writing, performance, and production skills. The practicum course is designed for students interested in writing scripts, performing, and producing for radio shows, online and other social media outlets. May be taken for up to 6 units of credit. Graded credit/No Credit. Formerly ENG 501.

ENG 5020. English Study Abroad. Units: 3

Research project based on traveling or living in an English-speaking country. Research for the project will be completed in the country of choice. When study is associated with an academic program, copies of grades, syllabus and submitted work may substitute for research project. May be taken for up to 6 units. Graded credit/no credit.

ENG 5030. English Practicum. Units: 3

This course allows students to apply theoretical, creative, and scholarly knowledge to a practical experience or project. Such projects may be carried out in a conventional classroom setting, or at/or in collaboration with an institution such as a government agency or local community organization. The class will meet regularly to develop and analyze student projects. May be taken for up to six units.

ENG 5100. Teaching English in the Secondary Schools. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Junior class standing
English as a secondary school subject including language, literature, and composition. Emphasis on theories and practices associated with reading, writing, and assessment. Formerly ENG 510.

ENG 5110. Creative Writing in the Secondary Classroom. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Advanced methods for teaching the techniques of creative writing. Focus on development of a portfolio of teaching material and digital and media literacy as related to creative writing. Requires a minimum six-hour field component. May be taken again for credit as topics change. Formerly ENG 511.

ENG 5110B. Creative Writing in the Secondary Classroom B. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Advanced methods for teaching the techniques of creative writing, focusing primarily on fiction and nonfiction. Focus on the development of a portfolio of teaching material and on digital and media literacy as they relate to creative writing. Requires a minimum six-hour field component.

ENG 5120. Literary and Cultural Criticism in the Public Sphere. Units: 3

Advanced study and production of literary criticism written for a public audience.

ENG 5130. Advanced Creative Writing in Specialized Genres. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Advanced workshop in writing in a specialized genre, with discussion of student writing and of exemplary works by established writers. May be taken again for up to 15 units as topics change. Formerly ENG 513.

ENG 5140. Community-Based Writing. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 3300
Study of a selected topic in community-based writing and literacy with a focus on the practice, teaching and/or learning of writing in non-university contexts. Includes attention to the ethics of writing and/or teaching within the given context(s). Requires a minimum ten-hour field component. May be taken for up to 6 units as topics change.

ENG 5150. Senior Seminar in Literature. Units: 3

Advanced study of a selected literary topic, including consideration of critical theory and methodology. May be taken again for up to 15 units as topics change. Satisfies GE designation WI. Formerly ENG 515.

ENG 5160. Professional Pathways for English Majors. Units: 2

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 2000
Preparation of English majors for various career paths. Guides students in reflecting on expertise they have gained in the English B.A. and how to translate that expertise for the workplace, graduate study and/or other professional contexts. Graded credit/no credit.

ENG 5170. Honors Project. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: B+ grade point average in the English major
Preparation of a piece of graduate-level writing (which may be an expansion of one of the student's papers or other work) to be presented at an honors colloquium. Required attendance at honors/research colloquia. B+ grade point average in the English major required. Graded credit/no credit. Formerly ENG 517.

ENG 5180. Research Project. Units: 3

Preparation of a piece of graduate-level writing (which may be an expansion of one of the student's papers or other work) to be presented at an honors colloquium. Required attendance at honors/research honors colloquia. Graded credit/no credit.

ENG 5190. Creative Writing: Thesis and Performance. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 3500 and ENG 5130, approval of a written application submitted in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken, and consent of instructor
A culminating experience for English majors in Creative Writing concentration, with a focus on revision of original student work for senior project and varying approaches to the performance of student work. Students may focus on their specialization in creative writing or select a project that is multidisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary in scope.

ENG 5210. Introduction to Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Units: 3

Survey of various language and communication disorders. Offers an overview of communication sciences and disorders as a field.

ENG 5220. Language and Speech Science. Units: 3

Introduction to aspects of speech and language, including those relevant to communicative disorders. Particular emphasis on articulatory, perceptual, and acoustic properties of speech sounds, and principles of language analysis.

ENG 5230. Grammar and Discourse. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 3110 and ENG 3220, or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 311 and ENG 420
Examination of the grammatical elements of English and their functions and meanings within discourse with an introduction to corpus-based approaches to examining contexts for grammatical choices. Formerly ENG 523.

ENG 5240. Sociolinguistics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 3110 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 311 and ENG 420
Examination of language use in a variety of communities and by a variety of speakers, and survey of the major issues and divisions in sociolinguistics, including social and regional language varieties, interactional sociolinguistics, the relationship of language and culture, multilingualism, code-switching, gender, and language change. Formerly ENG 524.

ENG 5250. Child Language Disorders. Units: 3

Overview of child language disorders associated with specific language impairment, autism spectrum disorder, brain injuries, and other genetic and environmental factors. Discusses assessment and intervention approaches for children.

ENG 5260. Phonetics and Phonology. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 3110 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 311
Study of speech sounds and sound patterns, with particular emphases on broad and narrow phonetic transcription; acoustic analysis of vowels, consonants, prosody and voice quality; and examination of sociophonetic variation. Formerly offered as ENG 526.

ENG 5270. Studies in Language and Linguistics. Units: 3

Intensive study in selected topics in linguistics or language. May be taken for up to 9 units as topics change.

ENG 5300. Creative Nonfiction. Units: 3

Advanced-level writing workshop exploring historical and contemporary approaches to literary nonfiction, including but not limited to memoir, diary, autobiography, personal essay, and lyric essay. Students generate their own creative works and participate in critical workshop discussions. May be taken 3 times for a total of 9 units.

ENG 5430A. Literary Production I. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Throughout the semester, students solicit, select, edit, proof-read, and arrange poems, short stories, artwork, and plays for a new issue of a literary journal or similar production. Theories and methods of literary circulation and publication addressing social, political, and aesthetic issues of literary production. Formerly ENG 543A.

ENG 5430B. Literary Production II. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Throughout the semester, students solicit, select, edit, proof-read, and arrange poems, short stories, artwork, and plays for a new issue of a literary journal or similar production. Theories and methods of literary circulation and publication addressing social, political, and aesthetic issues of literary production. Formerly ENG 543B.

ENG 5651. Special Studies in Writing. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Studies in particular topics in writing, such as assessment, learning theory and research on the teaching of writing. May be taken for up to 6 units of Special Studies in Writing credit. Formerly ENG 565.

ENG 5652. Special Studies in Writing. Units: 2

Quarter Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Studies in particular topics in writing, such as assessment, learning theory and research on the teaching of writing. May be taken for up to 6 units in Special Studies in Writing credit. Formerly ENG 566.

ENG 5751. Internship in English. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair
Supervised learning experience applying English-related skills in a work setting. A total of 6 units of internship credit may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Generally assumes 30 hours of work/study per unit of credit. Consent required. Formerly ENG 575B.

ENG 5752. Internship in English. Units: 2

Semester Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair
Supervised learning experience applying English-related skills in a work setting. A total of 6 units of internship credit may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Generally assumes 30 hours of work/study per unit of credit. Consent required. Formerly ENG 575C.

ENG 5753. Internship in English. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair
Supervised learning experience applying English-related skills in a work setting. A total of 6 units of internship credit may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit. Generally assumes 30 hours of work/study per unit of credit. Consent required. Formerly ENG 575D.

ENG 5951. Independent Study in English. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: Department Consent
Independent study of selected themes, figures, and areas in English. May be taken for up to 6 units of independent study credit. Consent required. Formerly Eng 595B.

ENG 5952. Independent Study in English. Units: 2

Semester Prerequisite: Department consent
Independent study of selected themes, figures, and areas in English. May taken for up to 6 units of independent study credit. Consent required. Formerly Eng 595C.

ENG 5953. Independent Study in English. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Department Consent
Independent study of selected themes, figures, and areas in English. May be taken for up to 6 units of independent study credit. Consent required. Formerly Eng 595D.

ENG 6000. Critical Approaches to Literature. Units: 3

Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 385 or consent of instructor
Study and practice of various critical approaches after the New Criticism, such as deconstructionism, feminism, reader response, and new historicism, with particular attention to their assumptions about the meaning and function of literature. Formerly ENG 600.

ENG 6010. Seminar in a Literary Period. Units: 3

Advanced study in a literary period. May be taken 3 times for a total of 9 units.

ENG 6020. Seminar in a Literary Genre. Units: 3

Advanced study of a selected genre. May be taken 3 times for a total of 9 units.

ENG 6030. Seminar in a Literary Theory. Units: 3

Advanced study in special topics in literary theory and criticism. May be taken 3 times for a total of 9 units.

ENG 6050. Special Topics in Applied Linguistics & TESL. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 3110 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 311 and ENG 420
Seminar in particular topics in applied linguistics and/or English language teaching. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Formerly ENG 605.

ENG 6090. Cultures of Research in English & Writing Studies. Units: 3

Critical study of disciplinary approaches to research in the fields of composition, linguistics, and literature, with attention to scholarly identities, research methods, research ethics, and research as knowledge production. This course satisfies the writing requirement for graduate candidacy for the M.A. in English and Writing Studies. Formerly ENG 609.

ENG 6120. Contemporary Composition and Discourse Theory. Units: 3

Examination of major texts and movements in contemporary composition and discourse theory. Formerly ENG 612.

ENG 6150. Discourse, Cognition, and Society. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 3110 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 311 or consent of instructor
Seminar in theoretical approaches to the analysis of discourse from social, pragmatic, and cognitive perspectives. Formerly ENG 615.

ENG 6190. Multilingualism and Second Language Acquisition. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 3110 or consent of the instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 311 or consent of the instructor
Seminar in the study of linguistic, cognitive, and social approaches to learning and using a second language or additional languages. Formerly ENG 619.

ENG 6210. Approaches to Teaching Imaginative Writing. Units: 3

Traditional and contemporary approaches to teaching imaginative writing; emphasis on means of encouraging different styles and modes of expression. Formerly ENG 621.

ENG 6260. TESL Methods. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 3110 or consent of the instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 311 and ENG 420; or consent of instructor
Seminar in methods for teaching English as a Second Language in various instructional contexts. Formerly ENG 626.

ENG 6300. Writing Center Studies. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6120 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 612 or consent of instructor
Advanced study of major texts and issues in contemporary writing center studies, including writing center theory, scholarship, and research; tutoring practice; and administration. Those completing this course with a grade of "B" (3.0) or better are eligible to apply to participate in campus writing tutoring programs. Formerly ENG 630.

ENG 6310. Seminar in Public and Professional Discourses. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6120 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 612 or consent of instructor
Advanced study in theory, scholarship, and practice in public and professional writing and discourses. May be taken 4 times for a total of 12 units as topics change. Formerly ENG 631.

ENG 6330. Seminar in Rhetorics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6120 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 612 or consent of instructor
Advanced study in a specific area of rhetorical history and theory. May be taken 4 times for up to 12 units as topics change. Formerly ENG 633.

ENG 6340. Seminar in Literacy Studies. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6120 of consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 612 or consent of instructor
Advanced study in a specific area of literacy studies. May be taken for up to 12 units as topics change. Formerly ENG 634.

ENG 6510. Seminar in a Literary Topic. Units: 3

Advanced study in particular topics in literature. May be taken 3 times for 9 total units as topics change. Formerly ENG 651.

ENG 6570. Seminar in Teaching Writing. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6120 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 612 or consent of instructor
Advanced study of a specific area of composition theory and pedagogy as practiced: in institutional contexts such as writing across the curriculum programs, online courses, community sites, or prisons; in specific sites of pedagogical intervention, such as student texts; or from specific theoretical or pedagogical traditions, such as queer pedagogy, liberatory pedagogy, or translingual theory. May be taken 4 times for a total of 12 units as topics change. Formerly ENG 657.

ENG 6580. Multimodal Writing and the Public Sphere. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6120 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 612 or consent of instructor
Advanced study of writing across multiple media and modes, including examination of theoretical, ethical, and pedagogical issues and engagement in composing practices across media and modes. Formerly ENG 658.

ENG 6590. Approaches to Teaching College-Level English Literature. Units: 3

Study of varied methods and approaches to the teaching of literature in English at the college level. Formerly ENG 659.

ENG 6600. Approaches to Teaching Writing. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6120. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 612
Study of the theories, principles, and methods of teaching writing. Formerly ENG 660.

ENG 6620. Sites of Praxis. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6000, ENG 6120, ENG 6150; and approval of the graduate coordinator. Quarter Prerequisite: ENG 600, ENG 612, ENG 615; and approval of the graduate coordinator
Seminar in the applications of English and Writing Studies to particular workplace and classroom settings, including ethnographic approaches to workplace cultures, attention to workplace genres, and ways of approaching and responding to writing in the workplace.

ENG 6660. Seminar in English and Writing Studies Pedagogies. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Advanced studies in particular topics in teaching English and writing studies at the college level. May be repeated for credit as topics change. May be taken 6 times for a total of 9 units. Formerly ENG 666.

ENG 6751. Internship in English and Writing Studies. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: ENG 6000, ENG 6120, ENG 6150, ENG 6620; and approval of the graduate coordinator. Prerequisite: ENG 600, ENG 612, ENG 615, and approval of the graduate coordinator
A practical application of theory and research in English and Writing Studies. Includes supervised work experience. May be repeated once for credit.

ENG 6951. Graduate Independent Study. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval of the graduate coordinator, proposals must be submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval of the graduate coordinator, proposals must be submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken
Advanced research on a specific topic, figure, or area in literature, composition and rhetoric, applied linguistics and TESL, pedagogy, or public and professional writing. Formerly ENG 696B. May be taken 2 times for up 2 units.

ENG 6952. Graduate Independent Study. Units: 2

Semester Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval of the graduate coordinator, proposals must be submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval of the graduate coordinator, proposals must be submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken
Advanced research on a specific topic, figure, or area in literature, composition, or linguistics. Formerly ENG 696C. May be taken 2 times for up to 4 units.

ENG 6953. Graduate Independent Study. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval of the graduate coordinator, proposals must be submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval of the graduate coordinator, proposals must be submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken
Advanced research on a specific topic, figure, or area in literature, composition, or linguistics. Formerly ENG 696D. May be taken up to 2 times for up to 6 units.

ENG 6954. Graduate Independent Study. Units: 4

Semester Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval of the graduate coordinator, proposals must be submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval of the graduate coordinator, proposals must be submitted on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken
Advanced research on a specific topic, figure, or area in literature, composition, or linguistics. Formerly ENG 696E. May be taken 2 times for up to 8 units.

ENG 6973. Thesis. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy, approval of the graduate coordinator, completion of all other required courses for the MA in English and Writing Studies, and good academic standing. Quarter Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy, approval of the graduate coordinator, completion of all other required courses for the MA in English and Writing Studies, and good academic standing
Graduate research in English composition and rhetoric, literature, public and professional writing, linguistics, applied linguistics, or pedagogy culminating in a written thesis.

ENG 6980. English Comprehensive Examination. Units: 0

Assessment of the students ability to integrate the knowledge of the area, show critical and independent thinking, and demonstrate mastery of the subject matter. Students may not enroll in ENG 6980 before their last quarter of coursework in the M.A. in English and Writing Studies. Formerly ENG 999. Graded credit/no credit. Department consent required. Course should be taken concurrently with ENG 6983.

ENG 6983. Comprehensive Exam Preparation and Completion. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy, approval of the graduate coordinator, completion of all other required courses for the MA in English and Writing Studies, and good academic standing. Quarter Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy, approval of the graduate coordinator, completion of all other required courses for the MA in English and Writing Studies, and good academic standing
Seminar to prepare students for assessment of their ability to integrate the knowledge of the area, show critical and independent thinking, and demonstrate mastery of the subject matter culminating in the comprehensive exam.

ENG 6990. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. Units: 0

Quarter Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in a Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing course each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

ENG 6991. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. Unit: 1

Quarter Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in a Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing course each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

ENG 6992. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. Units: 2

Quarter Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in a Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing course each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

ENG 6993. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. Units: 3

Quarter Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in a Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing course each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

ENG 6994. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. Units: 4

Quarter Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in a Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing course each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

ENG 6995. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. Units: 5

Quarter Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in a Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing course each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

ENG 6996. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. Units: 6

Quarter Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in a Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing course each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.