Economics (ECON)

Courses

ECON 2000. The Economy: Problems and Perspectives. Units: 3

Why have the rich become richer? Do immigrants take or create jobs? What is causing climate change, and what can be done about it? What determines how fast an economy grows? Is economic growth consistent with sustainability? What is the chance that children will do financially better (or worse) than their parents? Why are we subjected to recessions, housing bubbles/crashes, and financial crises? Can such harmful events be stopped? Will robots take all our jobs? This course will provide students with the tools and perspectives that will help them answer questions such as the above. Satisfies GE category D2; G designations. Satisfies Social Justice Pathway; Environmental Sustainability Pathway.

ECON 2201. Principles of Microeconomics. Units: 3

Introduction to markets and market economies. Investigation of demand, supply, production, the determination of prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of income. Business behavior in different market environments. Policies designed to alter market outcomes. Formerly ECON 200.

ECON 2202. Principles of Macroeconomics. Units: 3

Investigation of the operation of national economies, alone and as part of the global economy. Determinants of the rate of economic growth across countries and through time. Determinants of unemployment, inflation, and national output. Causes of stability and instability in the macroeconomy. The operation of government fiscal policy and monetary policy intended to promote growth and macroeconomic stability. Trade and financial flows among countries. Satisfies GE Category D2; G designation; Satisfies Global Connections Pathway.

ECON 3101. Political Economy of Southern California. Units: 3

Examination of the economic origins of political, social, and cultural life in Southern California, 1860-present. National and global influences on Southern California, such as the role of immigration and global trade, will be explored. Contending perspectives about the development of the region will be analyzed. Topics might include water rights, property law, the real estate market, labor relations, and labor history, as well as their impact on modern social, political, and cultural movements. Satisfies GE Category D3.

ECON 3103. Environmental Economics. Units: 3

Application of economic theory to environmental problems and issues using a political economy framework. Topics might include regulatory and market approaches to pollution and natural resource depletion; cost-benefit analysis and its economic and political foundations; and case studies of specific environmental problems such as locally unwanted land use, environmental racism, deforestation, and global warming. Formerly ECON 360.

ECON 3105. Political Economy. Units: 3

Critical analysis of capitalist economies. Topics might include class and power, the labor process, technology, theories of the state/government, and globalization. Formerly ECON 445.

ECON 3109. Political Economy of Women. Units: 3

Introduction to feminist economics and feminist theory, emphasizing the diversity of feminist approaches. Topics might include primitive accumulation and origins of sexual division of labor, household economics and care work, women's labor supply, gender wage gap and segregation in the labor markets, gendered impacts of economic crises, and welfare policy. Formerly ECON 333.

ECON 3125. Economic History of the United States. Units: 3

Economic history of the United States from the founding of the colonies to the present. Formerly ECON 421.

ECON 3199. Economics in the Elementary and Middle School. Units: 3

Introduces liberal studies students to economics in the California History/Social Science Standards. Students learn to integrate economic principles and theories with the other social sciences. May not be counted toward fulfillment of requirements of majors or minors offered by the Economics Department. Formerly ECON 311.

ECON 3312. Firms and Markets. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or ECON 2201; one of the following: MATH 1301, 1303, 1401, 1403, 1601, 1603 or 2110. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and one of the following: MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211
Historical evolution of business firms and markets. Recent developments in business behavior and the organization of markets.

ECON 3314. Public Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or ECON 2201; one of the following: MATH 1301, 1303, 1401, 1403, 1601, 1603 or 2110. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and one of the following: MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211
Analysis of selected government programs and of the role of the government in the economy. Among the topics possibly considered are social welfare programs (such as Social Security and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), budget deficits and the debt, the tax system, the minimum wage, government healthcare insurance programs, and environmental policies. Formerly ECON 475.

ECON 3316. Labor Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or ECON 2201; one of the following: MATH 1301, 1303, 1401, 1403, 1601, 1603 or 2110. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and one of the following: MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211
Micro- and macroeconomic aspects of labor markets including the workings of labor markets in competitive and noncompetitive markets, structure and causes of unemployment, incomes policies, and selected institutional topics including the economics of U.S. labor movements. Formerly ECON 460.

ECON 3318. International Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or ECON 2201; one of the following: MATH 1301, 1303, 1401, 1403, 1601, 1603 or 2110. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and one of the following: MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211
Theories of the causes and effects of trade between nations. Study of government policies that alter the pattern of trade between nations.

ECON 3400. Money, Banking, and Financial Markets. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or ECON 2202; one of the following: MATH 1301, 1303, 1401, 1403, 1601, 1603 or 2110. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 202 and one of the following: MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211
The nature and functions of money. Banks and their role in the money-creation process. Economic analysis of the financial system. Central banking, including the Federal Reserve System, and the conduct of monetary policy. Introduction to debates within monetary theory. Formerly ECON 410.

ECON 3500. Tools of Economic Analysis. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or both of ECON 2201 and ECON 2202; one of the following: ADMN 2100, MATH 1201, or MATH 1202 and MATH 1203; one of the following: MATH 1301, 1303, 1401, 1403, 1601, 1603 or 2110. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and ECON 202; ADMN 210 or MATH 262; and one of the following: MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211
Using software and basic economic models to investigate and analyze economic phenomena. Formerly ECON 335.

ECON 3720. Behavioral Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000, ECON 2201, or PSYC #311. Prerequisite: ECON 200 or PSYC 311
Blends the theoretical insights of psychology and economics to develop a fuller understanding of behavior in both economic and non-economic contexts. Use of a variety of methodologies (such as interviews, surveys, experiments, and formal modeling) to investigate the decision-making processes of individuals and groups along with the interactions between and among individuals and groups. Formerly a topic under Econ 390.

ECON 3730. Economic Development. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or both of ECON 2201 and ECON 2202. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and ECON 202
Overview of the major theoretical and empirical approaches to economic development. Consideration of fundamental characteristics of developing countries such as poverty and inequality along with the processes of agricultural transformation and population growth. Causes and consequences of trade involving developing countries. Industrial and finance policies. Consideration of globalization, the environment, and issues related to gender in developing countries. Formerly ECON 455.

ECON 3740. Economics of Climate Change. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or both of ECON 2201 and ECON 2202. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and ECON 202
Economic causes and consequences of climate change. Consideration of the unusual characteristics of human-caused climate change including a combination of global impacts, true uncertainty, large and discontinuous effects, and irreversibility. Policies proposed to mitigate climate change and to facilitate adaptation to climate change. Formerly ECON 365.

ECON 3750. Origins of Political Economy. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or both of ECON 2201 and ECON 2202, Students may also take the course with consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and ECON 202, Students may also take the course with consent of instructor
Economic theories of Karl Marx and the intellectual, political, and economic context in which they developed. Formerly ECON 443.

ECON 3780. Multinational Corporations. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or both of ECON 2201 and ECON 2202. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200 and ECON 202
Multinational corporations and the international economic environment in which they operate. Topics include the international monetary system, balance of payments, international capital movements, foreign direct investment, technology transfer, and conflicts between multinational corporations and host countries. Formerly ECON 435.

ECON 3790. Post-Keynesian Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 2000 or both of ECON 2201 and ECON 2202. Prerequisite: ECON 200 and ECON 202
Macroeconomic theory emphasizing fundamental uncertainty, financial instability, possible equilibriums generating persistent unemployment, and the central role of expectations and aggregate demand (even in the long-run).

ECON 3801. Selected Topics in Economics. Units: 3

Examination of selected topics of current interest in economics. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Formerly ECON 390.

ECON 3900. Writing in Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Two upper-division economics courses. Prerequisite: Two upper-division economics courses
Development of skills leading to effective writing in different contexts such as academia and the workplace. Among other things, students will use their economics training to write both on contemporary topics and on the nature of economics as a discipline. Satisfies GE designation WI.

ECON 4100. Intermediate Microeconomics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: One of ECON 3312, 3314, 3316, or 3318, or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200, ECON 202, and one additional upper-division economics course; one of MATH 110, 120, 211 or 192; or consent of instructor
Detailed analysis of economic behavior of individuals and business firms. Investigation of conflict, competition, and cooperation. Role of institutions and policies in altering market outcomes. Formerly ECON 302.

ECON 4200. Intermediate Macroeconomics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 3400 or consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200, ECON 202, and one additional upper-division economics course; MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211; or consent of instructor
Determinants of output and prices in national economies. Sources of stability and instability in the economy. Determinants of the rate of economic growth. Government policies designed to promote full employment, price stability, and economic growth. Formerly ECON 300.

ECON 4300. Econometrics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 3400, ECON 3500, and one of ECON 3312, 3314, 3316, or 3318. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200, ECON 202, and one additional upper-division economics course; ADMN 210 or MATH 262; MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211
Various statistical methods of testing economic hypotheses. Focus on understanding and using linear regression models. Formerly ECON 490.

ECON 4400. Quantitative Methods in Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 3400, ECON 3500, and one of ECON 3312, 3314, 3316, or 3318. Quarter Prerequisite: ECON 200, ECON 202, and one upper-division economics course; one of MATH 110, 120, 192, or 211
Application of mathematical tools and concepts in formulating and solving economic problems. Formerly ECON 480.

ECON 4525. Mixed Methods Research. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: one of ECON 3312, 3314, 3316, 3318, or 3720. Prerequisite: two upper-division economics courses
Using multiple research methods-such as surveys and interviews-to study economic phenomena.

ECON 4550. Advanced Tools of Economic Analysis. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 3500. Prerequisite: ECON 335
Using a variety of analytical and statistical tools to gain insight into the economy. Focus on answering policy-related, real-world questions.

ECON 4700. History of Economic Thought. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 3400 and one of ECON 3312, 3314, 3316, or 3318. Quarter Prerequisite: Two upper-division economic courses
Historical development of economic theory and associated analytical tools. Consideration of the intellectual and social forces that shaped economics. Formerly ECON 500.

ECON 4815. Global Inequality and Growth. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 3400 and one of ECON 3312, 3314, 3316, or 3318. Prerequisite: Two upper-division economics courses
Study of how and why income and wealth evolve in modern economies. Topics might include rising inequality, billionaires and capitalism, historical concentration of property ownership, economics of superstars and policies that affect these processes. Formerly a topic under ECON 390.

ECON 4900. Seminar in Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: ECON 3400 and one of ECON 3312, 3314, 3316, or 3318. Quarter Prerequisite: Two upper-division economics courses
Intensive study of some economic issue or theory. May be repeated for credit as subject matter changes. Formerly ECON 590.

ECON 5510. Economics in the Classroom. Units: 3

Economics method of analysis as it applies to 7th through 12th grade California History/Social Science Standards. May not be counted toward fulfillment of requirements of majors or minors offered by the Economics Department. Formerly Econ 510.

ECON 5601. Service-Learning in Political Economy. Unit: 1

Service experience in the community that makes use of the skills, knowledge, and understandings gained in economics and/or political economy. This course will reinforce a student's understanding of social responsibility and commitment to the community. Graded credit/no credit. Consent of the Department Chair is required to register. May be repeated for credit a maximum of two times.

ECON 5751. Internship in Economics. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: A completed Economics Department internship form must be submitted, and approved by the Department Chair, in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken, Open only to majors within the Economics Department. Quarter Prerequisite: A completed Economics Department internship form must be submitted, and approved by the Department Chair, in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken, Open only to majors within the Economics Department
Supervised work in a public or private organization emphasizing practical applications of economic concepts and relationships. May be repeated but only 3 units of internship courses may be counted toward any major offered by the Economics Department. Graded credit/no credit. Formerly Econ 575.

ECON 5752. Internship in Economics. Units: 2

Semester Prerequisite: A completed Economics Department internship form must be submitted, and approved by the Department Chair, in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken, Open only to majors within the Economics Department. Quarter Prerequisite: A completed Economics Department internship form must be submitted, and approved by the Department Chair, in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken, Open only to majors within the Economics Department
Supervised work in a public or private organization emphasizing practical applications of economic concepts and relationships. May be repeated but only 3 units of internship courses may be counted toward any major offered by the Economics Department. Graded credit/no credit. Formerly Econ 575.

ECON 5753. Internship in Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: A completed Economics Department internship form must be submitted, and approved by the Department Chair, in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken, Open only to majors within the Economics Department. Quarter Prerequisite: A completed Economics Department internship form must be submitted, and approved by the Department Chair, in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken, Open only to majors within the Economics Department
Supervised work in a public or private organization emphasizing practical applications of economic concepts and relationships. May be repeated but only 3 units of internship courses may be counted toward any major offered by the Economics Department. Graded credit/no credit. Formerly Econ 575.

ECON 5951. Independent Study. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval by the Department Chair of a completed Department independent study form filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval by the Department Chair of a completed Department independent study form filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken
Investigation of special topics not covered by the Department's curricular offerings. A total of six units of independent study may be applied toward majors offered by the Economics Department. Formerly ECON 595A.

ECON 5952. Independent Study. Units: 2

Semester Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval by the Department Chair of a completed Department independent study form filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval by the Department Chair of a completed Department independent study form filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken
Investigation of special topics not covered by the Department's curricular offerings. A total of six units of independent study may be applied toward majors offered by the Economics Department. Formerly ECON 595B.

ECON 5953. Independent Study. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval by the Department Chair of a completed Department independent study form filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: A minimum overall grade point average of 3, consent of instructor, and approval by the Department Chair of a completed Department independent study form filed in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken
Investigation of special topics not covered by the Department's curricular offerings. A total of six units of independent study may be applied toward majors offered by the Economics Department. Formerly ECON 595C.

ECON 5999. Senior Honors Project. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Senior standing, minimum grade point average of 3.5 in economics courses, consent of instructor, and approval by the Department Chair of a senior honors project form submitted in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken. Quarter Prerequisite: Senior standing, minimum grade point average of 3.5 in economics courses, consent of instructor, and approval by the Department Chair of a senior honors project form submitted in advance of the semester in which the course is to be taken
Original research in economics, culminating in a significant paper receiving approval from a committee of three economics faculty. Formerly ECON 597.

ECON 6000. Proseminar in Economics. Units: 2

Survey of the concepts and ideas that economists study, with emphasis on globalization. Formally Econ 600.

ECON 6303. International Economic Issues. Units: 3

Contemporary international economic issues of relevance, directly and indirectly, to national security.

ECON 6605. Advanced Topics in Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Quarter Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Advanced study of selected areas of economics. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

ECON 6951. Graduate Independent Study in Economics. Unit: 1

Semester Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by Department Chair of written proposal. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by Department Chair of written proposal
Independent graduate research in economics.

ECON 6952. Graduate Independent Study in Economics. Units: 2

Semester Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by Department Chair of written proposal. Quarter Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by Department Chair of written proposal
Independent graduate research in economics. Formerly ECON 695B.

ECON 6953. Graduate Independent Study in Economics. Units: 3

Semester Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by Department Chair of written proposal. Quarter Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor, and approval by Department Chair of written proposal
Independent graduate research in economics. Formerly ECON 695C.