Academic Regulations and Standards

All students who register at California State University, San Bernardino in resident study must first be admitted to the university by the Office of Admissions and Student Recruitment.

No student may attend classes unless officially registered and appropriate fees have been paid.  Students are required to make all payments on the regularly announced days.

Students are granted credit only for those courses in which they are formally registered and are responsible for completing all courses under their name on the schedule confirmation list, except those courses they officially change through My Coyote Self Service.

Class Level of Students

Students are classified at the end of each quarter according to total earned credits accepted for transfer and/or completed at California State University, San Bernardino as follows:

Status Units earned
Lower-division
Freshman
0-44.9 quarter units
Sophomore
45-89.9 quarter units
Upper-division
Junior
90-134.9 quarter units
Senior
135 quarter units or more
PostbaccalaureateHolding a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college and not pursuing a graduate degree program (2nd B.A./certificate)
Unclassified
No degree or credential objective, nor pursuing a 2nd B.A. or B.S. or certificate
Conditionally classified
completing prerequisite requirements for the credential
Classified
pursuing a credential
GraduatePostbaccalaureate student pursuing a gradduate degre
Conditionally classified
Completing prerequisite requirements for graduate degree
Classified
Admitted to the degree program

SOAR (Student Orientation, Advising & Registration)

CSUSB Orientation and First Year Experience website

SOAR (Student Orientation, Advising & Registration) is CSUSB's student orientation program that is required for all newly admitted undergraduate students to attend. It is much more than just choosing classes or taking a campus tour. It is an opportunity to meet other new students, review academic choices with advisors, learn how to be a successful student, and learn what it means to be a CSUSB Coyote.

SOAR provides you with key resources and tools to help ease the transition into the CSUSB community as you bond with other new students, fellow upper classmen, and your Orientation Leaders. Through workshops, discussions, guest speakers and special events, this experience will prepare you for life as a Coyote. 

Advising

Students must take responsibility for the decisions which affect their academic progress. Faculty, staff and peer advisors at the university are available to assist students by providing academic advisement during their office hours or by appointment.

However, before a student meets with an advisor, the following steps are highly recommended:

  1. Become knowledgeable about university policies, procedures and requirements.
  2. Bring an updated copy of your PAWS (Program Advising Worksheet for Students) to the advising appointment.
  3. Develop a tentative course schedule using the University Bulletin, Class Schedule and PAWS.
  4. Gather all relevant decision-making information such as work schedules or other time commitments.
  5. Prepare a list of questions or topics to discuss with the advisor. This is a good opportunity to discuss educational and career goals.

Faculty Advisor

Students have the opportunity to meet with a faculty advisor each term for help in planning their academic programs and schedules of classes. Usually, the faculty advisor is from the student's major field. To make contact with an advisor use Who is My Advisor or call the appropriate department office as listed in the Class Schedule. Students who have not yet declared a major should contact the office of Advising and Academic Services for an appointment. All students should confer with an advisor on a regular basis.

Academic Probation

Undergraduate students who are placed on academic probation must confer with and academic advisor in the office of Advising and Academic Services prior to registration and must adhere to the advisor's specific recommendations which are designed to improve the student's grade point average and overall success at CSUSB. Students in EOP (Educational Opportunity Program) must meet with the EOP office for academic probation.

Academic Course Load

Students planning to finish their undergraduate degree requirements in four years by attending three quarters each academic year must complete a minimum of 15 degree applicable units per quarter. To be considered full-time for veteran's benefits and financial aid purposes, an undergraduate student must enroll in a minimum of 12 units. Students may register for up to 17 quarter units per term (seniors may register for up to 19.5).

Unit Overloads

A student may register for more than 17 units (19.5 for seniors) only upon petition to his or her college dean. Normally, petitions are approved only if both the grade point average for the previous term and the overall grade point average are 3.0 or better. Additional units may be added once "Open Enrollment" begins, if classes remain open and the overload is approved. During summer, only 17 max units are allowed for the term.

Mandatory Basic Skills

College-level skills in written communication (composition), computation (mathematics), oral communication and critical thinking are basic to success at the university. To qualify for first-year Composition and General Education mathematics courses, all new students who are not exempt must take the English Placement Test (EPT) and the Entry Level Mathematics (ELM) tests before registering for their first quarter of attendance. Students are also required to complete the English Department’s Directed Self-Placement (DSP) assessment in order to select the appropriate English composition course. Students may choose to enroll in any of the five first-year Composition options (ENG 102AENG 103A - ENG 104A), (ENG 102B - ENG 103B - ENG 104B), (ENG 105A - ENG 106A), (ENG 105B - ENG 106B) or ENG 107. They must remain enrolled in their chosen option until their General Education requirement has been completed (ENG 104A, ENG 104BENG 106A, ENG 106B, or ENG 107). All new students who have not completed the General Education mathematics requirement (or equivalent courses) must enroll in a General Education mathematics course (MATH 110, MATH 115, MATH 120, MATH 165, MATH 192, or MATH 211). They must remain enrolled in these courses until the requirement has been completed. Students who do not qualify for enrollment in those courses must enroll in appropriate developmental courses (MATH 75, MATH 80 or MATH 90, depending on ELM scores) until they are qualified to enroll in the General Education mathematics requirement. Students must complete the first-year composition course and any required developmental work in mathematics during the first year of enrollment unless granted an exception. The academic year begins July 1 and ends June 30. Failure to meet these requirements will result in the ending of matriculation at CSUSB. Contact the office of Advising and Academic Services for special circumstances at (909) 537-5034.

Accelerated Progress

Some students choose to accelerate progress toward completion of their objectives through a program of independent study and registration for additional course credits.

In addition, credit-by-examination procedures permit students to demonstrate their mastery of the content of local courses, as described below, or courses offered through the Advanced Placement Program, International Baccalaureate Program, or the subjects tested by the College Level Examination Programs.

Students wishing to enroll for additional course work during the academic year should follow the procedures described in the section on academic course load, above.

Credit for Comprehensive Examination Courses

Any student admitted to this campus may earn degree credit for no more than three comprehensive examination courses regardless of the total units earned in those courses. This maximum is to be counted separately from all other out-of-class curriculum options (for example, credit by examination). The student's major discipline may further restrict the number of comprehensive examination credits acceptable toward the major.

In cases where the subject matter of a comprehensive examination course duplicates that of a course taken previously, the university's Repeat of Course policy will apply. In no instance will duplicate credit be awarded for a repetition of subject matter.

Credit by Examination

A student may petition to receive course credit by examination. In this manner a student who already possesses, or through independent study is able to acquire, the skills or knowledge of the ideas and concepts of a course can accelerate progress through the university. Students must register for the examination in the office of the college or department concerned before the first day of classes of the term in which the course is offered. Some presumptive evidence is required to indicate that the student has a reasonable chance of passing the examination. The student must complete the examination within the first two weeks of the term. Courses may be designated by a college, school, department or appropriate unit as inappropriate to be challenged by examination on the basis that course content is not suited to such examination.

No fee is charged for these examinations. A student who passes an examination is given the grade of CBE for that course, provided that this does not duplicate credit counted for his admission to the university. No official record is made of failures in these examinations.

Examinations for course credit are given under the following restrictions:

  1. They may be taken only by students matriculated through regular enrollment at the university in courses other than the one(s) to be challenged.
  2. They may not be taken by students who have received credit for work in the subject in advance of the course in which the examination is requested, except where permission is granted by the college or department concerned.
  3. They may not be taken to raise grades or remove failures in courses.
  4. Once students have successfully challenged a course, they may not subsequently enroll in the course for credit. Units attempted, units earned and grade points for any such enrollment will be disallowed.
  5. A maximum of 40 units of credit may be received through such examinations.
  6. A student may repeat an examination for credit only upon approval of the associate provost for academic programs.
  7. Credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum residency requirement.
  8. The course must be offered during the term in which the examination is taken. However, students may not enroll in a course they plan to challenge. If the challenge is unsuccessful, the student may add the course subject to the regulations for adding a class printed in the Class Schedule.

Exact times and places of examinations are announced by the departments concerned. Students who wish to take an examination should consult the departmental office well in advance.

For regulations concerning credit by examination in graduate programs refer to Graduate Degree and Program Requirements.

Concurrent Enrollment

A student in good academic standing at California State University who has completed at least 18 quarter units of work at the university, and who is eligible to register as a continuing student for the subsequent term, may enroll concurrently at another college. Note that students attending CSUSB on I-20 visas are not eligible for concurrent enrollment.

Undergraduate students wishing to complete courses at another institution must submit a Concurrent Enrollment contract with the Office of the Registrar 2-3 weeks prior to the start of the term. Credit may not be awarded for course work completed without this prior approval. Approval will only be granted for California Community Colleges, or other local institutions with which articulation agreements are in place. Upon completion of the course(s), the student must request that an official transcript be sent to CSUSB.

Courses that use non-traditional off-campus delivery systems, such as self-paced instruction, correspondence courses, or on-line computer instruction and testing may be required to be proctored through the Testing Office.

Intrasystem and Intersystem Enrollment Programs

Fully matriculated students enrolled at any CSU campus have access to courses at other CSU campuses on a space available basis unless those campuses/programs are impacted. This access is offered without students being required to be formally admitted to the host campus and in most cases without paying additional fees. Students should consult their home campus academic advisors to determine how such courses may apply to their specific degree programs before enrolling at the host campus.

There are two programs for enrollment within the CSU and one for enrollment between CSU and the University of California or California Community Colleges. Additional information about these programs is available from Office of the Registrar.

CSU Fully Online Courses

Matriculated students in good standing may request enrollment in one course per term, offered by a CSU host campus. Enrollment requests will be granted based on available space, as well as completion of any stated prerequisites. Credit earned at the host campus is electronically reported to the student’s home campus to be
included on the student’s transcript at the home campus.

CSU Visitor Enrollment

Matriculated students in good standing enrolled at one CSU campus may enroll at another CSU campus for one term. Credit earned at the host campus is reported at the student’s request to the home campus to be included on the student’s transcript at the home campus.

Intersystem Cross Enrollment

Matriculated CSU, UC, or community college students may enroll on a “space available” basis for one course per term at another CSU, UC, or community college and request that a transcript of record be sent to the home campus.

UCR/CSUSB Cross Registration Program

On a limited basis, students may be permitted to take advantage of courses offered at the nearby University of California campus in Riverside. Note: this opportunity is available only for undergraduate courses not normally offered at CSUSB and is subject to availability of space at UC Riverside after their early registration process is completed. The following conditions apply:

  1. A limited number of students may participate.
  2. A limit of one course per student per quarter.
  3. The student is matriculated and currently enrolled in a degree program.
  4. Students attending CSUSB on I-20 visas may participate, but must be concurrently enrolled in (and complete) at least 12 units at CSUSB, and may enroll only in upper-division courses that are not offered at CSUSB.
  5. Student must pay sufficient (full) tuition fees at the Home Campus. No additional registration fees will be required at the Host Campus.
  6. The desired course is not offered at the Home Campus.
  7. Student must be in good academic standing.
  8. Student must observe all academic deadlines and regulations of the Host Campus.
  9. Enrollment is subject to space availability and consent of the instructor.
  10. Student must meet course prerequisites of the Host Campus.
  11. Records of grades will be maintained by the Host Campus and forwarded to the Home Campus. The Home Campus will include the "transfer" work on the student's transcript, with a footnote indicating that the course was taken through the exchange program.
  12. Residence credit will be granted for courses taken by CSUSB students under this arrangement.
  13. Cross-registration students will have the use of library facilities at the Host Campus. The student is not eligible for other student services or facilities.

Class Schedule

An official academic term Class Schedule, prepared each quarter by the university, includes the registration schedule, procedure for registration, fees, classes offered by hours and instructors, and other pertinent registration information. The schedule is available just prior to advisement and priority registration each quarter at the Academic Scheduling web site. Students are responsible for being aware of information contained in the academic term Class Schedule.

Registration Procedures

All registration, including schedule adjustments (adds and drops) and late registration, will be accomplished using My Coyote Self Service.

Simultaneous Enrollment

Procedures have been established whereby a student may enroll in two courses that are scheduled to meet at overlapping times. The student should procure a Petition for Waiver of University Regulations from Advising and Academic Services, meet with instructors for both of the courses involved to make special arrangements, and obtain the written approval of both instructors. All other registration procedures apply, including the use of Add Slips for courses that are closed or for enrollment after the second week of class.

Late Registration

The dates of late registration each term will be announced in the academic term Class Schedule. The university calendar lists registration dates. Late registrants may find themselves handicapped in arranging their programs due to closed classes. A $25 late registration fee is required for students not already enrolled by the late registration deadline.

Auditing Courses

Enrollment in any course as an auditor shall be permitted only after students otherwise eligible to enroll in the course on a credit basis have had an opportunity to do so and only upon consent of the instructor. Auditors are subject to the same fee structure as credit students, and regular class attendance is expected.

Credit for courses audited will not subsequently be granted on the basis of the audit. Transcripts are not issued for audited courses.

Once enrolled as an auditor, a student may not change to credit status unless such a change is requested within the first week of class and is approved by the instructor. Students registered for credit may change their status from that of enrolled student to that of auditor with the approval of the class instructor concerned and within the first three weeks of class.

Forms for such changes may be obtained at the Office of the Registrar in University Hall.

Class Attendance

Regular attendance is expected of all students enrolled at the university. The instructor of each class sets specific standards expected of students.

A student absent from classes is responsible for arranging to make up missed class work and assignments. In cases of prolonged absence, the student should investigate the feasibility of withdrawal from the university.

Adding Classes

During the Open Enrollment and Schedule Adjustment period (see academic term Class Schedule for specific dates) students may add classes by following the Registration Instructions detailed in the academic term Class Schedule. It is important to note that students who add a class or classes after the first scheduled class session may find themselves at a distinct disadvantage in terms of doing well in the class(es). Students should also be aware that they are responsible for any material they may have missed as a result of adding after the first day.

Adding an Open Class

Beginning with the first day of classes, students may add classes if space is available through the first week (five business days) of the quarter via My Coyote Self Service. During the second week of the quarter, classes may be added with the permission of the instructor. During the third week of the quarter, students will need the permission of the instructor and the department chair in order to add a class. Students may not add classes after the end of the third week of the quarter except for serious and compelling reasons and only with the approval of the instructor, the Department Chair, and Dean of the College in which the course resides. For questions concerning this policy, contact the Office of the Registrar at (909) 537-5200.

Adding a Closed Class

During the first three weeks of the quarter, students may add a closed class with the permission of the instructor and the department chair. Students may not add closed classes after the end of the third week of the quarter except for serious and compelling reasons and only with the approval of the instructor, the Department Chair, and Dean of the College in which the course resides.

Retroactive Add

Requests for adding a class following the close of the term (retroactive add) will only be considered in the event of an error on the part of the university. Petitions for retroactive adds will be considered by the Associate Vice President of Undergraduate Studies for undergraduates or the Dean of Graduate Studies for postbaccalaureate and graduate students and will require documentation from the instructor which will show that the student attended the class and earned a passing grade.

Drops and Withdrawals

Beginning Fall quarter 2009, undergraduate students may not exceed 28 quarter units of withdrawals (grade of "W"). Withdrawals completed prior to Fall 2009 are not included in this total. This limit applies only to courses taken at CSUSB, including courses taken through Open University, the College of Extended Learning and special sessions. The policy for all undergraduate students will be available at the CSUSB Undergraduate Advising website. For credential, postbaccalaureate, and graduate students, the policy can be found in the Graduate Programs section of the current Bulletin under “Retroactive Withdrawals.”

Census Date

Census Date (also known as Census Day) refers to two very important deadlines:

  1. Last day a student can add a class (by permit since it is the third week of classes)
  2. Last day a student can drop a class without a record on the student's transcript.

Specific Census Dates for each term are listed in the Academic Calendar and in the academic term Class Schedule. Census Date falls on the last day of the third week of the Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer (Regular) Session. Census Date for Summer Session 6W1 and Summer Session 6W2 falls on the sixth day in either session.

Dropping Classes

A drop is defined as a withdrawal through Census Date. Drops do not produce a record on the student's transcript.

Students should read this section carefully to understand fully when and for what reasons they may drop a course themselves. Students transferring from other institutions should note that the last day to drop a class without a record of enrollment (i.e., Census Date) takes place much earlier at CSUSB than they may have been accustomed to at other institutions.

It is the students' responsibility to verify their schedules prior to Census Date. Grades will be assigned for every course in which they are officially registered. It is also the students' responsibility to drop by Census Date any class which they do not plan to attend and complete. While an instructor may drop students for non-attendance during the first three weeks of classes (see "Administrative Drop Policy"), students should not assume this will be done.

Dropping classes through Census Date

During the Open Enrollment and Schedule Adjustment period (see academic term Class Schedule for specific dates) students may drop classes by following the Registration Instructions detailed in the academic term Class Schedule. Students may drop a class during the first three weeks of the Fall, Winter, or Spring quarters (i.e. from the first day of instruction through Census Date), and the course will not appear on their permanent records; however, a refund will not be granted if the drop is beyond the refund deadline date. See the academic term Class Schedule for specific dates for each quarter, including Summer.

Administrative Drop

Faculty members may initiate an administrative drop of a student in their courses based on any one of the following criteria:

Lack of attendance

Students who fail to attend two consecutive class meetings during the first three weeks of the quarter without contacting the faculty member or making special arrangements may be dropped. Students in on-line or hybrid classes who fail to make contact with the instructor either in person or electronically (via e-mail or Blackboard) within the first four days of the start of the quarter may also be dropped during the first three weeks of the quarter.

Prerequisites not met

Students who are unable to show completion of required courses or who do not have the background needed to succeed in the course may be dropped.

Declared majors

Students who have not been formally admitted to certain major programs may be dropped from courses that are open only to declared majors in that program. To remain in such classes, permission of the instructor may be required.

Students should not assume they are automatically disenrolled. Instead, they are strongly encouraged to check their MyCoyote to confirm course enrollment and drops every quarter.

If the administrative drop reduces the student's unit load below 6.1 units, the student may be eligible for a refund of certain fees. However, it is the student's responsibility to file a request for a refund of fees by the deadline printed in the academic term Class Schedule. Questions regarding refunds should be addressed to the Student Accounts Office at 909-537-5162.

Withdrawing from Classes

Withdrawal from classes after Census Date

A course dropped after Census Date is defined as a withdrawal and a grade of "W" will be posted to the student's record if the withdrawal is approved. Beginning Fall quarter 2009, undergraduate students may withdraw from no more than 28 quarter units during their entire undergraduate academic career at CSUSB.

Withdrawals after Census Date and through the end of the eighth week of the quarter are permitted only for serious and compelling reasons. See the Summer academic term Class Schedule for withdrawal dates during the summer terms. The student will be required to submit a petition with documentation to support the request to withdraw from the course(s). Poor performance or poor attendance in the course is not an acceptable reason to withdraw from a course during this period.

Petitions to withdraw after Census Date are available in the offices of the five Colleges for declared majors and in Advising and Academic Services (UH-380) for undeclared students. Withdrawals during this period will require written documentation along with the signature of the instructor, the department chair or school director of the class, and the Dean of the College of the student's major. Courses officially withdrawn during this time period will show a grade notation of "W" (withdrawn) on the student's transcript for the dropped course(s). Students receiving a "W" are still subject to fees for the courses. In certain circumstances, withdrawals after Census Date may qualify for an exemption to the 28 unit maximum. Such requests must meet the same standard and be processed in the same manner as described in the next section of this policy.

Withdrawal from classes in weeks nine through the last day of instruction shall not be permitted except in cases, such as accident or serious illness, where the cause of withdrawal is due to circumstances clearly beyond the student's control, and the assignment of an Incomplete is not practicable. Withdrawals of this sort may involve total withdrawal from the campus or may involve one or more courses. Before submitting a petition to withdraw from class, students are strongly advised to discuss with their instructor(s) the possibility of receiving an Incomplete. In cases in which sufficient work has been completed to permit an evaluation to be made, a grade and credit or an Incomplete may be assigned to allow the student to retain credit for work which would otherwise be lost due to complete withdrawal.

Requests for permission to withdraw in weeks nine through the last day of instruction must be made by petition with documentation to support the request to withdraw. These requests will be processed by the Director of Advising and Academic Services, UH-380. If approved, such withdrawals will not count against the 28 units students are allowed to withdraw.

Excessive or Unauthorized Withdrawal

Students who do not officially withdraw or who exceed the 28 unit maximum will receive a grade notation of "WU" (withdrawal unauthorized) in the course, which for purposes of grade point averages is equivalent to an "F." Students receiving a "WU" are still subject to fees for the courses. Failure to follow formal university procedures may result in an obligation to pay fees as well as the assignment of failing grades in all courses not officially dropped, and the need to petition for readmission before being permitted to enroll in another academic term.

Term Withdrawal from All Classes

Students who find it necessary to withdraw from all classes after enrolling for any academic term are required to follow the University's official Term Withdrawal procedures outlined in the Class Schedule. Beginning ten days prior to the start of the quarter, these withdrawals must be processed in person in the Office of the Registrar, UH-171. A picture ID is required to complete the in-person withdrawal. Prior to this time, the withdrawals can be processed by the student through MyCoyote. Call 909-537-5200, option 5 for more information. Failure to follow formal University procedures may result in an obligation to pay fees, as well as the assignment of failing grades in all courses, and the need to petition for readmission before being permitted to enroll in another academic term.

Students who receive financial aid funds are strongly encouraged to consult with the Financial Aid Office prior to withdrawing from the University regarding any required return or repayment of grant or loan assistance received for that academic term or payment period. Students who have received financial aid and withdraw from the institution during the academic term or payment period may need to return or repay some or all of the funds received, which may result in a debt owed to the institution.

Term Withdrawal through Census Date

During the Open Enrollment and Schedule Adjustment period (see academic term Class Schedule for specific dates) students may withdraw from the university by following the registration instructions detailed in the academic term Class Schedule during the first three weeks of the Fall, Winter, or Spring quarters (i.e. from the first day of instruction through Census Date) and will have no record of enrollment listed on their permanent record. A refund will not be granted if the withdrawal is beyond the refund deadline date. See the academic term Class Schedule for specific dates for each quarter, including Summer.

Term Withdrawal after Census Date

Term Withdrawals after Census Date and through the end of the eighth week of the quarter are permitted only for serious and compelling reasons. See the Summer academic term Class Schedule for withdrawal dates during the summer terms. The student will be required to submit a petition with documentation to support the request to withdraw from all course(s). Poor performance or poor attendance in the course(s) is not an acceptable reason to withdraw during this period.

Petitions to withdraw after Census Date are available in the offices of the five Colleges for declared majors and in Advising and Academic Services, UH-380, for undeclared students. Withdrawals during this period will require written documentation along with the signature of the instructor, the department chair or school director of the class, and the Dean of the College of the student's major. All courses officially withdrawn during this time period will show a grade notation of "W" (withdrawn) on the student's transcript for the dropped course(s). Students receiving a "W" are still subject to fees for the courses.

In certain circumstances, withdrawals after Census Date may qualify for an exemption to the 28 unit maximum. Such requests must meet the same standard and be processed in the same manner as described in the next section of this policy.

Withdrawal from all classes in weeks nine through the last day of instruction shall not be permitted except in cases, such as accident or serious illness, where the cause of withdrawal is due to circumstances clearly beyond the student's control and the assignment of an Incomplete is not practicable.

Requests for permission to withdraw in weeks nine through the last day of instruction must be made by petition with documentation to support the request to withdraw. These requests will be processed by the Director of Advising and Academic Services. If approved, such withdrawals will not count against the 28 units students are allowed to withdraw.

Retroactive Term Withdrawal

Requests for retroactive term withdrawals shall be permitted for serious and compelling reasons, such as accident or serious illness, where the cause of withdrawal was due to circumstances clearly beyond the student's control and an Incomplete was not assigned. Extenuating circumstances must be shown to have prevented withdrawal in a more timely fashion. Documentation is required. Poor performance or poor attendance in the course(s) is not an acceptable reason to withdraw after the term. Employment-related reasons are also unacceptable. Lack of awareness of the withdrawal procedure is not an extenuating circumstance. All courses must be withdrawn and will be noted with a "W" on the permanent record. If approved, such withdrawals will not count against the 28 units from which students are allowed to withdraw.

Forms for Retroactive Term Withdrawal by undergraduates are available only in the office of the Director of Advising and Academic Services in UH-380. Partial withdrawal of classes during a term is not permissible unless special circumstances exist and the Dean of the student's major grants approval. Requests for Retroactive Term Withdrawal by unclassified post baccalaureate students, credential candidates and graduate students must be made in writing to the Dean of Graduate Studies, CH-123.

Leave of Absence

Degree-seeking undergraduate students who plan to be absent from the university for more than two consecutive quarters must file a leave of absence to preserve their current catalog rights (Title 5, Article 5, See. 40401). A petition, available through the Office of Advising and Academic Services, UH-380, 537-5034, must be filed and approved.

The leave of absence policy covers both involuntary and voluntary interruptions. In most instances, with an approved leave of absence, a student may be absent from the campus without losing rights to specific degree requirements under an earlier catalog.

Petitions for leaves of absence should be filed in advance of the interruption in enrollment. Each leave commences with the first regular quarter of non-attendance. Requests for medical and military leaves may be considered retroactively if supported by individual circumstances, but those requests must be filed no later than Census Date of the third regular quarter of non-attendance. Personal and planned educational leaves cannot be retroactive since they constitute an agreement or "contract" which must be set in advance. The maximum duration for any leave is two calendar years, although exceptions to the two-year limit may be granted under extenuating circumstances.

Leaves of absence will not be approved for students subject to disqualification or dismissal due to academic deficiencies or disciplinary action. Other students ineligible for leaves of absence are those who are not completing any degree applicable course work, those who are enrolling only in extension courses or those who are only auditing courses.

Students who do not return to CSU, San Bernardino at the conclusion of their planned leaves and those who enroll elsewhere without permission of the Office of the Registrar will be considered to have withdrawn from the university at the end of their last quarter of regular enrollment.

International students must submit a copy of the leave of absence petition to the International Center, UH-235. Visa students must be registered as full-time students except when, after three consecutive quarters of regular enrollment, they decide to take a quarter off. All leave of absence periods must be approved by ISS prior to taking the leave in order to report the students properly to the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services (BCIS). As a general rule, visa students must go back to their home country when applying for a leave of absence, as their primary goal in the U.S. is to obtain an academic degree.

The following Leaves of Absence may be requested:

Medical Leave of Absence

Requests must be accompanied by a statement from a medical doctor explaining why the student must interrupt enrollment. Exceptions to the two-year limit may be granted under extenuating circumstances.

Military Leave of Absence

SHORT TERM ABSENCE DUE TO MILITARY COMMITMENT INFORMATION

California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB) supports students called to active duty in the U.S. Military. The policies and procedures described in this document apply to CSUSB students who are U.S. Military service members that are voluntarily or involuntarily called to active duty including service in the National Guard or Reserves. Short term absence due to military commitment pertains to those who will miss classes for their military service or necessitates withdrawal for a period not to exceed 2 consecutive quarters (excluding summer).

For absences within the quarter that do not result in a withdrawal from the quarter:

Military service members who will miss classes for short-term military service or for training exercises are encouraged to contact their instructors as soon as they become aware of the need for the absence.

  • Faculty members may request a copy of orders, letter from a commanding officer, etc.
  • Faculty members are encouraged to make academic accommodations or opportunities for students to complete course assignments and/or exams when possible.

For absences that result in withdrawal from a quarter and/or no enrollment for up to 2 consecutive quarters (excluding summer):

Military service members who were absent from CSUSB for service in the Armed Forces are eligible to return to CSUSB based on the following provisions:

  • Absence is due to active service in the Armed Forces, including the National Guard or Reserves, for more than 30 days.
    • Students will be asked to submit the SHORT TERM ABSENCE DUE TO MILITARY COMMITMENT FORM to the Veterans Success Center and documentation that the absence is due to service in the Armed Forces.
      • Examples of such documentation include a copy of orders, letter from a commanding officer
      • Students who do not submit the form and documentation prior to service may provide documentation at the time of return.*
  • Students will maintain their program, enrollment and academic status.
  • As provided for in the California Education Code 66023, CSUSB will refund fees paid by the student for the term in which he or she was called to active military service.
  • Based on federal regulations, institutions have the discretion to determine whether a student is prepared to return to his or her program with the same academic status at the point where the student left off, or will not be able to complete the program. CSUSB will make reasonable efforts at no extra cost to the student to help the student become prepared or to enable the student to complete the program with additional assistance such as providing refresher courses at no extra cost to the student and allowing the student to retake a pretest at no extra cost to the student.

* Students who are unable to provide documentation due to military necessity (for example, because of a  classified mission, operation or exercise) may sign a statement attesting that the absence was due to military service.

Personal and Planned Educational Leaves of Absence

These leaves are defined as a planned interruption or pause in a student's regular education during which the student temporarily ceases formal studies at CSU, San Bernardino. The student must plan to return to CSU, San Bernardino at the end of the leave. Such activities may be for the purpose of clarifying or enriching educational goals or to allow time to address personal matters and thus enhance the prospect of successful completion of the student's academic program.

Since students on leave maintain their catalog rights, courses completed at other institutions must have received prior approval in order to be transferred back to CSU, San Bernardino. Therefore, a student must also file a concurrent enrollment form with the Office of the Registrar to obtain that approval. Failure to file a concurrent enrollment form may result in coursework not being accepted and revised GE and major requirements being required. Official transcripts must be submitted once coursework is completed.

Returning from Approved Leave of Absence

When students plan to return from their leave, a readmission form, available through the Office of the Registrar must be submitted within the filing period for the quarter of return. No application fee will be assessed for leaves of absence that meet the terms of the leave agreement. If a student was on an approved educational leave, official transcripts are required.

Final Examinations

Written examinations of two hours' duration are held at the close of each term. In courses extending over more than one term, the examination in the concluding term may also cover work done in the preceding term or terms. Examinations may not be taken before or after the scheduled period nor may the time of an examination be changed without authorization by the dean of the appropriate college. Permission to take a final examination with a different section in the same course may be granted by the dean of the appropriate college with the consent of the instructors concerned. Failure to take or to pass any final or other course examinations will result in such deficiencies as instructors may assign.

Final Grade

Final grades will be available to students within two weeks after the last day of each quarter except for Fall quarter grades which will be available the first business day of the following January. Grades are accessed through My Coyote Self Service.

Student Academic Grievance Procedures

Advising and Academic Services, UH-380
CSUSB Undergraduate Advising and Academic Services website

Questions regarding the Student Academic Grievance Procedures are available from Advising and Academic Services, University Hall, Room 380, 909-537-5034, or from the website.

A student may appeal a final course grade or a grade on a Comprehensive Examination or a project (e.g. art exhibition) or thesis required for graduation.  An appeal may be initiated on the basis of:

1.  Clerical error

2.  Capricious or prejudicial evaluation

3.  Inconsistent or inequitably applied standards for evaluation

Students may also appeal other types of academic decisions.  These include, but are not limited to:

1.  Denial of Admission to or Dismissal from a course, major or program

2.  Placement on Academic Probation

3.  Suspension or Dismissal from the university

A simple allegation or unsubstantiated assertion is an insufficient basis for lodging a formal complaint.  Students must support their allegations with evidence compelling enough to give the Academic Grievance Committee reason to hold a formal hearing.

Grades

The grade symbols used at the university are as follows:

Grade symbol Performance level Grade points per quarter hour
AExcellent4.0
A-3.7
B+3.3
BGood3.0
B-2.7
C+2.3
CSatisfactory2.0
C-1.7
D+1.3
DPassing1.0
D-.7
FFailing.0
WUWithdrawal Unauthorized.0
UUnauthorized Incomplete.0
IIncomplete Authorized.0
ICIncomplete Charged.0
RPReport in Progress
SPSatisfactory Progress
CRCredit
NCNo Credit
CBE Credit by Exam
CBXCredit by Exam (Remedial Course)
AUAudit
RDReport Delayed
WWithdrawn
WFWithdrawn Failing.0
FWFailed, Withdrew.0
UWUnofficial Withdrawl.0

All courses, except those specifically designated otherwise, will be graded on the A through F basis.

Grade point averages are computed by dividing the number of grade points earned by the number of units attempted. Only units and grade points earned by a student while enrolled at this university are used to compute the resident grade point average. Grades from courses numbered 1-99 are not computed in this average.

The following administrative grades carry no grade points and are, therefore, not used to determine a student's grade point average. However, it should be pointed out that the Incomplete will be changed to an IC (incomplete charged) and calculated as an F if not removed within one calendar year from the date it was assigned, unless the instructor assigned an earlier completion date on the Incomplete form.

CBECredit by Examination
CBXCredit by Examination/Remediation
CRCredit
IIncomplete (Authorized)
NCNo Credit
RDReport Delayed
RPReport in Progress
SP Satisfactory Progress
WWithdrawal

Expanded Grade Symbol Definitions

A (Excellent): Meeting course requirements with a superior level of performance. A is recognized to be an honors evaluation.

B (Good): Meeting course requirements with a high level of performance.

C (Satisfactory): Meeting course requirements with an acceptable performance.

D (Passing): Meeting course requirements with minimally adequate performance.

F (Failing): Inadequate performance or not meeting course requirements.

CR (Credit): A satisfactory or better level of performance, equivalent to the grade of "C" (2.0) or better, has been demonstrated in meeting course objective. For graduate courses, equivalent to grade of "B" (3.0) or better.

NC (No Credit): Performance at an unsatisfactory or failing level, equivalent to a grade of "C-" (1.7) or less. For graduate courses, equivalent to a grade of less than "B-" (2.7). Does not award credit for the course or affect grade point average.

CBE (Credit by Exam): This symbol indicates that a student has successfully passed a course through an examination. Awards units earned toward degree. It is not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

CBX (Credit by Exam/Remediation): This symbol indicates that a student has successfully passed a remedial course through an examination. Does not award units earned toward a degree. It is not included in the calculation of grade point average.

I (Incomplete): An Incomplete signifies that a portion of required course work has not been completed and evaluated in the prescribed time period due to unforeseen, but fully justified reasons and that there is still a possibility of earning credit. It is the responsibility of the student to bring pertinent information to the instructor and to reach agreement on the means by which the remaining course requirements will be satisfied. A final grade is assigned when the work agreed upon has been completed and evaluated. Students may not re-enroll in a course for which he or she has received an "I" until that "I" has been converted to a grade other than "I", e.g., A-F, IC, or NC.

An Incomplete must be made up within one calendar year immediately following the end of the term in which it was assigned or before graduation unless the instructor assigned an earlier completion date on the Incomplete Form. This limitation prevails whether or not the student maintains continuous enrollment. Failure to complete the assigned work will result in an Incomplete being converted to an IC (or an NC if applicable) for grade point average computation, unless a specific grade was assigned on the Incomplete form. Note: In some instances the instructor may have indicated on the Incomplete Form a grade to be assigned in the eventuality that the remaining course work is not completed.

Students may not receive an "I" grade in any applicable degree course for the term in which their graduation check is filed. Students will be required to refile their grad check for the term in which the outstanding requirements are fulfilled. An Incomplete in a course not required for the degree must have a final grade assigned at the time of graduation, or the Incomplete will convert to an "IC" (or an "NC" if applicable). At the time of graduation, no Incompletes may remain on a student's record.

IC (Incomplete Charged): The IC symbol is used when a student who received an authorized incomplete "I" has not completed the required course work within the allowed time limit. The "IC" replaces the "I" and is counted as a failing grade for grade point average and progress point computation.

RD (Report Delayed): The RD symbol is used in those cases where a delay in the reporting of a grade is due to circumstances beyond the control of the student. The symbol is assigned by the Office of the Registrar and is replaced by a more appropriate grading symbol as soon as possible. An RD is not included in the calculation of grade point averages.

RP (Report in Progress): The RP symbol is used in connection with courses that extend beyond one academic term. It indicates work is in progress but that assignment of a final grade must await completion of additional work. Work is to be completed within one year except for graduate degree theses. (Previously SP.)

W (Withdrawal): The symbol W indicates that the student was permitted to withdraw from the course after the 15th day of instruction with approval of the instructor and appropriate campus officials. It carries no connotation of quality of performance and is not used in calculating grade point average. For withdrawal limits, see the class schedule or CSUSB Undergraduate Advising website . Students who have withdrawn from the maximum 28 units allowed will be assigned a WU grade for any subsequent withdrawals.

WU (Withdrawal Unauthorized): The symbol WU indicates that an enrolled student did not withdraw from the course and also failed to complete course requirements. It is used when, in the opinion of the instructor, completed assignments or course activities or both were insufficient to make normal evaluation of academic performance possible. A grade of WU will also be assigned to students who have withdrawn from the maximum of 28 allowed units. For purposes of grade point average and progress point computation this symbol is equivalent to an F. (Previously U.)

Policy on Nontraditional Grading

All courses are graded on an A through F basis, except those specifically designated as follows:

Credit/No credit

Credit is awarded for grades equivalent to C (2.0) or better. For graduate level courses, credit is awarded for grades equivalent to a grade of B (3.0) or better. No credit is awarded for grades equivalent to C- or less. For graduate level courses, no credit is awarded for grades equivalent to B- or less.

ABC/No credit

Grades awarded are A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+ or C. No credit is awarded for grades equivalent to C- or less.

Certain activity courses, independent study projects, and other courses serving special needs are not readily evaluated in the traditional A through F manner. The non-traditional credit/no credit grading allows faculty to award credit for satisfactory performance in an activity, rather than assign a letter grade when such performance cannot be evaluated traditionally.

Courses graded credit/no credit, whether taken at this or at another institution, may not be used to satisfy requirements for the major, except specific courses designated by the department to be graded credit/no credit.

Students who, because of a change of major or because of transfer from another institution or for any other reason, present courses in the major field which have been graded on a credit/no credit basis may, at the discretion of the department or other appropriate academic unit, be required to pass competency examinations at an acceptable level or to take prescribed alternate courses before being allowed to continue in the major.

A student may offer no more than 36 quarter units of work graded credit/no credit in satisfaction of the total units required in the student's baccalaureate degree program at California State University, San Bernardino. This number includes any combination of units graded credit/no credit earned at California State University, San Bernardino and any other institution or institutions, excepting that all units accepted for transfer credit from another institution at the time of the student's admission to the university may be used toward the satisfaction of the total units required for the baccalaureate degree. Acceptance for transfer credit by California State University, San Bernardino of 36 quarter units or more graded credit/no credit at another institution or institutions precludes the student from taking courses graded credit/no credit at California State University, San Bernardino, for satisfaction of units required for the baccalaureate degree.

Course grades of credit received under a credit-by-examination program are exempt from the 36-unit limitation.

Retention, Academic Probation and Disqualification

For purposes of determining a student's eligibility to remain at the university, quality of academic performance toward the student's objective shall be considered. Such eligibility shall be determined by the use of grade point average. Also see the Student Conduct Code for other regulations governing expulsion, suspension, and probation. This policy is in effect beginning Spring 2009 following the Minimum Requirements for Probation and Disqualification established by Executive Order No. 1038.

Academic Probation

An undergraduate student is subject to academic probation if at any time the cumulative grade point average in all college work attempted or the cumulative grade point average at California State University, San Bernardino falls below 2.0 (Title 5, California Code of Regulations, Section 41300 (a)). The student shall be advised of probation status promptly.

An undergraduate student shall be removed from academic probation when the cumulative grade point average in all college work attempted and the cumulative grade point average at California State University, San Bernardino is 2.0 or higher.

Academic Disqualification

An undergraduate student on academic probation is subject to academic disqualification (as authorized by Section 41300 (b) of Title 5) when:

  1. As a freshman (fewer than 45 quarter units of college work completed) the student falls below a grade point average of 1.50 in all units attempted or in all units attempted at the campus where enrolled.
  2. As a sophomore (45 through 89.9 quarter units of college work completed) the student falls below a grade point average of 1.70 in all units attempted or in all units attempted at the campus where enrolled.
  3. As a junior (90 through 134.9 quarter units of college work completed) the student falls below a grade point average of 1.85 in all units attempted or in all units attempted at the campus where enrolled.
  4. As a senior (135 or more quarter units of college work completed) the student falls below a grade point average of 1.95 in all units attempted or in all units attempted at the campus where enrolled.

The President (as authorized by Section 41300 (c) of Title 5) has designated the Director of Advising and Academic Services to act to disqualify an individual not on probation when the following circumstance exists:

  1. At the end of any term, the student has a cumulative grade point average below 1.0, and
  2. The cumulative grade point average is so low that in view of the student's overall educational record, it seems unlikely that the deficiency will be removed within a reasonable period, as defined by campus academic policy.

Notice of Disqualification

Students who are disqualified from further attendance at the end of any quarter under any of the provisions of this policy should be notified before the beginning of the next consecutive regular quarter. Students disqualified from further attendance at the beginning of a summer enrollment break should be notified at least one month before the start of the fall term. In cases where a student ordinarily would be disqualified from further attendance at the end of a term, save for the fact that it is not possible to make timely notification, the student may be advised that the disqualification is to be effective at the end of the next term. Such notification should include any conditions which, if met, would result in permission to continue in enrollment. Failure to notify students does not create the right of a student to continue enrollment.

Probation and Disqualification

Probation and Disqualification of postbaccalaureate and graduate students are subject to Section 41300 (d), (e), and (f) of Title 5 and criteria established by the Office of Graduate Studies.  See Standards for Graduate Study.

Administrative-Academic Probation

An undergraduate or graduate student may be placed on administrative-academic probation by action of appropriate campus officials (as authorized by Section 41300.1 of Title 5) for any of the following reasons:

  1. Withdrawal from all or a substantial portion of a program of studies in two successive terms or in any three terms. (Note: A student whose withdrawal is directly associated with a chronic or recurring medical condition or its treatment is not to be subject to Administrative-Academic probation for such withdrawal.)
  2. Repeated failure to progress toward the stated degree objective or other program objective, including that resulting from assignment of 15 units with grades of NC, when such failure appears to be due to circumstances within the control of the student.
  3. Failure to comply, after due notice, with an academic requirement or regulation, as defined by campus policy, which is routine for all students or a defined group of students (examples: failure to complete a required CSU or campus examination, failure to complete a required practicum, failure to comply with professional standards appropriate to the field of study, failure to complete a specified number of units as a condition for receiving student financial aid or making satisfactory progress in the academic program).

When such action is taken, the student shall be notified in writing and shall be provided with the conditions for removal from probation and the circumstances that would lead to disqualification, should probation not be removed.

Administrative-Academic Disqualification

A student who has been placed on administrative-academic probation may be disqualified from further attendance (as authorized by Section 41300.1 of Title 5) if:

  1. The conditions for removal of administrative-academic probation are not met within the period specified.
  2. The student becomes subject to academic probation while on administrative-academic probation.
  3. The student becomes subject to administrative-academic probation for the same or similar reason for which he has been placed on administrative-academic probation previously, although not currently in such status.

When such action is taken, the student shall receive written notification including an explanation of the basis for the action.

Administrative Contract Appeal and Readmission Process

An undergraduate student placed on academic probation may appeal this action by contacting the Director of Advising and Academic Services. An undergraduate student placed on academic probation may be required to meet with an academic advisor for academic probation advising in the office of Advising and Academic Services. Failure to meet with an advisor or failure to meet the terms of the Administrative Contract will result in a registration service indicator hold for future enrollment.

An undergraduate student subject to disqualification will not be permitted to enroll in any regular term and may be denied admission to other educational programs operated or sponsored by the university. The student must contact the office of Advising and Academic Services at (909) 537-5034 or (909) 537-5035 in order to receive the guidelines to petition for readmission.

Repeat of Courses: Undergraduate Students

  1. Undergraduate students may only repeat courses if they earned grades lower than a "C." This policy (which went into effect as of Fall 2009) applies to any grade earned at CSUSB at any time. A maximum of twenty-four (24) units may be repeated for grade forgiveness (formerly called grade discounting). An additional eighteen quarter units may be repeated with both grades averaged into the grade point average calculation. Students are allowed a maximum of three (3) attempts per non-repeatable course. No repeats will be allowed beyond these limits.

Course Repeats with Grade Forgiveness

Grade forgiveness (discounting a grade) for a repeated course is by petition only. If the petition for grade forgiveness is approved, the new grade replaces the former grade in terms of GPA calculation. Petitions should be filed after the completion of the course used to discount the previous course. Students are strongly encouraged to speak with an advisor before repeating a course for grade forgiveness to ensure that the student is eligible to repeat that course to discount the grade.

  1. Grade forgiveness (or discounting), as used in these guidelines, means that when computing grade point averages required for graduation with a baccalaureate degree, "units attempted," "units passed," and "grade points" for the first attempt shall be excluded. The first attempt will remain on the transcript with the repeat (discount) noted. Course repeats with discounting or "grade forgiveness" are permissible for undergraduate students subject to the following provisions:
    1. Undergraduate students may repeat a maximum of 24 quarter units with grade forgiveness. This maximum includes any repeats taken at any time at CSUSB.
    2. Undergraduate students may repeat an individual course for grade forgiveness no more than two times. In other words, if a student earns a grade of "C-" or lower in a first attempt at a class, the student may repeat that class to replace the grade. If the grade earned the second time is still lower than a "C," the student may repeat the course a final time. No subsequent attempts will be allowed.
    3. Grade forgiveness shall not be applicable to courses for which the original grade was the result of a finding of academic dishonesty.

Course Repeats with Grades Averaged

  1. Undergraduate students may repeat an additional 18 quarter units in which the repeated grade will be averaged with the most recent grade provided the original grade was lower than a "C." These units are in addition to the 24 quarter units described above for which grade forgiveness is permitted. In such instances the repeat grade shall not replace the original grade. Units earned will be removed from the first attempt, and both grades shall be calculated into the student's overall grade point average.
  2. A course may not be repeated for the purpose of removing an Incomplete. Incompletes that have changed to an "IC" or a letter grade lower than a "C" may be discounted on repeat.
  3. If a course which was taken at CSUSB is repeated elsewhere, the grades will be averaged in determining a student's overall grade point average. Repeating a course elsewhere will not affect a student's CSUSB grade point average but will affect the cumulative GPA. Units earned will be removed from the first attempt.
  4. Grades for courses taken at one institution (other than CSUSB) and repeated at another institution (other than CSUSB) will be averaged when determining a student's cumulative transfer grade point average. Units earned will be removed from the first attempt.
  5. Grades for courses taken at one institution (other than CSUSB) and repeated at CSUSB will be averaged when determining a student's cumulative grade point average. Units earned will be removed from the first attempt.
  6. For transfer work, CSUSB will honor the repeat-of-course policy in effect at the institution issuing the transfer transcript.
  7. Courses taken for undergraduate credit may not be repeated for discount as a postbaccalaureate student.
  8.  Unclassified postbaccalaureate students may be permitted to repeat a course taken as an undergraduate. However, the grade earned shall not replace the grade in the undergraduate record.
  9. Credit by Examination (CBE) may not be used to discount a course taken previously.
  10. Students on approved Leaves of Absence or dismissal may repeat a course through the College of Extended Learning's Open University program in order to improve their CSUSB grade point average and petition for grade forgiveness. To take advantage of this provision, the student must first have a Leave of Absence approved by the Office of Advising and Academic Services. Once that is approved, the student must petition to repeat a course with a grade of "C" or better. If that is approved, the student can file a petition for grade forgiveness once the final grade has been posted. These shall count toward the maximum of 24 units that can be repeated for grade forgiveness.

Students taking classes during non-state supported summer sessions may also repeat a course in order to improve their CSUSB grade point average and petition for grade forgiveness. If the petition is approved, it will count toward the 24 unit maximum allowed for grade forgiveness and toward the 36 unit maximum of units applied from Open University. Simultaneous regular enrollment and enrollment through Open University is not permitted.

Contact Advising and Academic Services, UH-380, (909) 537-5034, for questions regarding repeating courses.

Petitions for waivers of this university regulation will only be considered in exceptional cases. Petitions must be made in writing to the Associate Vice President of Undergraduate Studies.

The foregoing provisions apply only to undergraduate students. Postbaccalaureate and graduate students must report to the Office of Graduate Studies to submit a petition for discounting. Regulations for repeating graduate courses can be found under Graduate Degree and Program Requirements.

Academic Renewal

Under certain circumstances, a student may petition to have up to three quarters of previous coursework disregarded from all considerations associated with requirements for the baccalaureate degree. In order for this to happen the following conditions must be met:

  1. The work to be disregarded must have been completed at least five years before the date of the petition to disregard it.
  2. The student has completed all GE, major and elective requirements with the exception of the cumulative and/or CSUSB grade point average of 2.0. The student must demonstrate that it would be necessary to complete additional units and enroll for one or more additional terms in order to qualify for the baccalaureate if the request were not approved.
  3. During the interval since completing the work to be disregarded, the student must have maintained a satisfactory record at CSUSB (22 units with at least a 3.0 grade point average; 45 units with at least a 2.5 grade point average; or 67 units with at least a 2.0 grade point average).

The approval would allow the student to be in good academic standing. Students seeking academic renewal should consult with the Director of Advising and Academic Services in University Hall, Rm 380.

Plagiarism and Cheating

Plagiarism and cheating are violations of the STANDARDS FOR STUDENT CONDUCT Code and may be dealt with by both the instructor and the STUDENT CONDUCT ADMINISTRATOR. 

Procedures for addressing cheating and plagiarism are found below. Questions about academic dishonesty and the policy should be addressed to the OFFICE OF STUDENT CONDUCT AND ETHICAL DEVELOPMENT.

Plagiarism is the act of presenting the ideas and writing of another as one's own. Cheating is the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for academic work through the use of any dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means.

Cheating includes but is not limited to:

  • Copying, in part or in whole, from another's test, software, or other evaluation instrument;
  • Submitting work previously graded in another course unless this has been approved by the course instructor or by departmental policy;
  • Submitting work simultaneously presented in two courses, unless this has been approved by both course instructors or by the department policies of both departments;
  • Using or consulting during an examination sources or materials not authorized by the instructor;
  • Altering or interfering with grading or grading instructions;
  • Sitting for an examination by a surrogate, or as a surrogate;
  • Any other act committed by a student in the course of his or her academic work, which defrauds or misrepresents, including aiding or abetting in any of the actions defined above.

Plagiarism is academically dishonest and subjects the offending student to penalties up to and including expulsion. Students must make appropriate acknowledgements of the original source where material written or compiled by another is used.

Procedure

Allegations of academic dishonesty may be handled directly by the instructor AND MUST BE REFERRED BY THE INSTRUCTOR TO THE OFFICE OF STUDENT CONDUCT AND ETHICAL DEVELOPMENT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH CSU SYSTEMWIDE STUDENT CONDUCT PROCEDURES

If handled by the instructor, the instructor has the following responsibilities:

  • To preserve the evidence in support of the allegation;
  • To notify the student of the allegation and of the evidence on which it is based;
  • To provide the student a reasonable opportunity to challenge or rebut the allegation;
  • To notify the student of the action being taken.

The instructor may employ any of the following sanctions:

  • Verbal or written reprimand;
  • Assignment of appropriate task or examination;
  • Change of grade, including assigning a punitive grade to the work involving the dishonesty, or for the course, project, thesis, or any other summary evaluation of the student's academic work.
  • In determining eligibility for graduation with University Honors for with a second bachelor degree, all baccalaureate-level coursework completed past high school will be used in the GPA calculation.

If the student does not wish to accept the sanction proposed by the instructor, the student may request and require that the allegation be referred to the OFFICE OF STUDENT CONDUCT AND ETHICAL DEVELOPMENT. In that event, the procedures specified under EXECUTIVE ORDER - STUDENT CONDUCT PROCEDURES of the California State University shall be observed. The instructor shall not impose any sanction other than the sanction(s) imposed through the disciplinary procedure.

Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws

Anyone who is found to be liable for copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages suffered as a result of the infringement along with any profits of the infringer attributable to the infringement that are not already taken into account in computing the actual damages, or “statutory” damages between $750 and $30,000 per work infringed. In the case of a “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed (see 17 U.S.C. §504). Courts also have discretion to award costs and attorneys’ fees to the prevailing party (see 17 U.S.C. §505). Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense. Criminal penalties may vary depending on the nature of the offense and whether the infringer has previously been convicted of criminal copyright infringement under 18 U.S.C. §2319 (see 17 U.S.C. §506 and 18 U.S.C. §2319).

Declaring (or Changing) a Major

Work in a major field of study is designed to afford students the opportunity to engage in intensive study of a discipline. Because there is a strong correlation between having a declared major and persistence at the university, all students are strongly encouraged to declare a major as quickly as possible. Students may declare a major at the time of admission. For some students, there will be a period of time early in their academic careers when they are unsure of the course of study they wish to pursue, and those students may take longer to declare a major. All CSUSB students with fewer than 70 quarter units must declare a major by the time they achieve junior class status (90 quarter units). Students transferring to CSUSB with 70 or more quarter units are strongly encouraged to declare a major when they matriculate.

In order to declare or change a major, students should process a Change of Major form through the Office of the Registrar. Before submitting the Change of Major, students should contact an advisor in the new major for advising. Students who declare a major or change from one major to another following admission will be held to either:

  1. The current catalog for requirements of the major and to the catalog under which they entered for other college requirements (for example, general education), or
  2. The catalog in effect at the time of graduation for all requirements.

Note that dual concentrations within the same major will require approval from the Department Chair.

Students who are applying to an impacted major must complete the Application for Impacted Majors form.  Impacted majors are noted in the Bulletin of Courses.  A complete list is also posted in the Office of the Registrar. 

A processing fee will be assessed each time a student files a Change of Major form. (See Class Schedule for fee.)

Required Declaration of a major

A non-transfer CSUSB student who has not declared a major will receive a notice from the office of Advising and Academic Services when the student has 70 units (this will count work in progress). The notice will require that the student come into the office of Advising and Academic Services and meet with an advisor to talk about selecting a major. A registration service indicator hold will be placed on the student's file, and the student will not be allowed to register for a subsequent term until he or she has come in for that appointment. Counseling regarding the selection of a major will be the focus of that appointment leading to referral to an academic department or, in some cases, to the Career Development Center. A student who does not declare a major by the time he or she has completed 90 quarter units will not be allowed to register without the approval of the Director of Advising and Academic Services.

The procedure for transfer students will depend on the total number of units CSUSB counts toward the student's degree. Students who receive credit for fewer than 70 quarter units will be held to the same timeline for declaring a major as students who began at CSUSB as first-time freshmen. Students who come in with 70 or more quarter units will be required to declare a major after they have completed 20 units at CSUSB. If a major is not declared at admission, the transfer student will receive a notice from the Office of Advising and Academic Services. The notice will require that the student come into the office of Advising and Academic Services and meet with an advisor to talk about selecting a major. A registration hold will be placed on the student's file, and the student will not be allowed to register for a subsequent term until he or she has come in for that appointment. Counseling regarding the selection of a major will be the focus of that appointment leading to a referral to an academic department or, in some cases, to the Career Development Center. If a major is not declared by the completion of 20 quarter units at CSUSB, a transfer student held to this policy will not be allowed to register without the approval of the Director of Advising and Academic Services

Election of Graduation Requirements

A student remaining in continuous attendance in regular sessions and continuing in the same major in this university, in any of the California community colleges, or in any combination of California community colleges and campuses of the California State University, may, for purposes of meeting graduation requirements, elect to meet the graduation requirements in effect at this university either at the time of entering the program or at the time of graduation from this university, except that substitutions for discontinued courses may be authorized or required by the proper university authorities. (See the section on Leave of Absence.)

University Honors

University Honors for graduation

To be considered for University Honors for graduation, an undergraduate student must have completed a minimum of 45 units of work at CSUSB in courses for which letter grades (A, B, C and D) were received. University Honors for commencement are based on the student's units and GPA through the end of the quarter prior to commencement (i.e. winter for spring commencement and summer for fall commencement).

  • Summa Cum Laude: an overall cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.9 or above and a grade point average of 3.9 or above in all work attempted at this university.
  • Magna Cum Laude: an overall cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.75 or above and a grade point average of 3.75 or above in all work attempted at this university.
  • Cum Laude: an overall cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.5 or above and a grade point average of 3.5 or above in all work attempted at this university.

In determining eligibility for graduation with University Honors with a second bachelor's degree, all baccalaureate-level coursework completed past high school will be used in the GPA calculation.

Dean's List

An undergraduate student completing 12 or more units for which letter grades (A, B, C and D) were received, and who earns a 3.5 or above in any regular academic term will be placed on a Dean's List.

  • Dean's Letter of Recognition. Any full-time undergraduate student, meeting the above requirements, who earns a 4.0 in any regular academic term will receive a letter of special recognition from the appropriate dean.
  • Presidential Letter of Recognition. Any full-time undergraduate student, meeting the above requirements, who earns a 4.0 in three consecutive regular academic terms will receive a letter of special recognition from the president of the university.

Departmental Honors

Individual departments may award departmental honors at graduation, recognizing distinguished students majoring in that field. The requirements to be met to earn honors are specified by the respective departments. Departmental honors are currently awarded in accounting and finance, anthropology, Arabic, art, biology, chemistry, communication, computer engineering, computer science, criminal justice, economics, English, environmental studies, French, geography, geology, health science, history, human development, human services, information and decision sciences, kinesiology, liberal studies, management, marketing, mathematics, music, nursing, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, public administration, sociology and Spanish.

Graduation Requirement Check

Undergraduate students must request a Graduation Requirement Check (Grad Check) at the Office of the Registrar (UH-171) when they have completed 135 units towards their degree. Graduate students must request a Grad Check at least one term prior to their expected graduation.

To avoid late fees, the Grad Check should be filed by the established deadlines listed below. Graduate students may file the Grad Check by the deadlines below without being advanced to candidacy, but the Grad Check cannot be completed until the advancement is received in the Office of the Registrar.

Graduation Term Filing Date (first business day)
Summer QuarterJanuary
Fall QuarterFebruary
Winter QuarterMay
Spring QuarterNovember

The fee for filing the Grad Check is $25 for each major/option requested. If the Grad Check is filed after the deadline, an additional $20 late fee for each major/option will be charged. Students who do not complete the requirements in the term for which the Grad Check was filed must re-file and pay a $20 fee for a second Grad Check for each major/option. If the re-filed Grad Check is submitted after the deadline date, an additional $20 late fee will be charged for each major/option.

Access to subsequent registration will not be allowed until the Grad Check has been re-filed or a graduate application is submitted for readmission.

The Office of the Registrar will mail the official Grad Check to the address listed on the Grad Check Request form.

Conferral of Degree Upon Completion of Requirements

The CSU Chancellor has authorized campus presidents to confer degrees upon students as soon as they have completed all degree requirements. To ensure that students do not take unnecessary units beyond those required for the degree, the Office of the Registrar will monitor progress toward the degree based, in part, on units completed. Particular attention will be paid to those students who have completed 120% of the units required for a degree. If it is determined that a student has completed all requirements for a degree and has not filed a graduation check, the student will be notified by the Office of the Registrar that appropriate fees will be assessed and the degree will be conferred.

Students may petition the Associate Vice President of Undergraduate Studies to delay conferral of the degree. Such petitions must be filed within two weeks of receipt of the notice referred to above. Such petitions will only be considered when there is a compelling academic reason to allow the student additional time. Petitions will not be granted for additional time to improve a GPA, nor will petitions be granted for time beyond one term to complete a second undergraduate degree.

In the event that a student does not petition to delay conferral of the degree within the two-week grace period, the degree will be posted to the student's transcript for the term in which all requirements were completed. Additionally, a hold will be placed on the student record that will prevent the student from registering for classes, obtaining a diploma, transcripts, or enrollment verification. Students enrolled in the subsequent term will be disenrolled from all classes. The student will also be assessed the graduation check fee and any late fees to which they are subject.

Diplomas

Diplomas are issued for a specific degree. Minors are not included on the diploma but are recorded on the student's university transcript.

Students earning a Special Major will automatically receive a diploma stating "Special Major." Students wishing to have a diploma reflect the field of study will need to purchase a duplicate diploma requesting this additional information. Duplicate diploma forms are available in the Office of the Registrar and require a $25 processing fee.

Commencement

Special Events and Guest Services- Commencement Office
(909) 537-7360

Participation in commencement activities is voluntary.

For dates and deadlines please visit commencement.csusb.edu.

Palm Desert Campus

The Palm Desert Campus holds one commencement exercise in June. In order for all eligible students to obtain information, the deadline to file a graduation check and be included in the Commencement Program is the last working day in April. The non-refundable commencement fee can be paid online or at the Palm Desert Office. Questions regarding this exercise should be directed to the Palm Desert Campus Administrative Office (760) 341-2883. Palm Desert Campus graduates have the option of also participating in the main campus exercises.

Master's and Doctoral Students

In order to participate in commencement, candidates completing a master's or doctoral degree must file a grad check AND meet the eligibility requirements specified by their program. For the specific requirements, candidates should consult their program coordinator or go to Graduate Studies website .

Credential Students

Students completing a Multiple Subject, Single Subject, Education Specialist Basic credential, Pupil Personnel Services  or Designated Subjects credential are eligible to participate in a Credential Recognition Ceremony rather than commencement. The Credential Recognition Ceremony on the San Bernardino campus will be held in June. Specific information can be obtained from the College of Education, Student Services Office, CE-102, (909) 537-5609. The Credential Recognition Ceremony on the Palm Desert Campus will be held in May at PDC . Specific information can be obtained from the Palm Desert Campus College of Education Office at (760) 341-2883.

Postbaccalaureate Credit for Senior Students

Upon approval, senior students who need fewer than 16 quarter units to graduate may be permitted to enroll for postbaccalaureate credit during the final quarter of their senior year. Postbaccalaureate credit is used to signify courses taken after the baccalaureate degree, but does not necessarily mean graduate credit, i.e., credit applicable toward an advanced degree. Only 300- to 600-level courses will be considered. Note: Some 500- and 600-level courses require prerequisites and are open only to students classified in a master's program. A petition for this purpose is available in the Office of the Registrar.

Information for Issuance of Transcripts

Single transcripts are issued at a cost of $6 per copy, payable in advance. (Refer to the fee schedule in the Class Schedule or the Fees page of this catalog.) Copies are normally mailed two weeks after receipt of request. However, if the request specifies inclusion of grades just earned or verification of a degree just awarded, two to three weeks must be allowed beyond the end of the term for a transcript to be issued.

All transcripts will be complete as of the date of issuance showing all work attempted at California State University, San Bernardino.

The university will not issue transcripts to the student, another educational institution or a third party if there is a transcript service indicator hold in place. The student must contact the Office of the Registrar once the hold has been lifted so that the transcript request can be processed.

Access to Records

All student records, including recommendations, are kept by the university in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, which allows students access to their records. Inquiries and concerns about this federal regulation should be directed to the Office of the Vice President for Student Services for further information.

Enrollment Verification

Student enrollment certification is based on the following minimum unit loads for undergraduate students:

Full time12 weighted units
3/4 time9-11 units
1/2 time6-8.5 units

Veterans Enrollment Certification

California State University, San Bernardino, is approved for the training of veterans of the military services and their dependents under educational assistance programs, established by the state and federal governments. Applications for educational benefits may be obtained directly from the veterans certification clerk in the Office of the Registrar.

Student enrollment certification is based on the following minimum unit loads for undergraduates:

Full time12 quarter units
3/4 9-11.5 quarter units
1/2 time 6-8.5 quarter units

The university will certify course loads to the Veterans Administration based on the criteria above for units which are degree or objective applicable. Veterans enrolled less than half time are eligible for reimbursement of tuition and fees only.

Student Email Policy

The University intends to replace many of the letters sent to students via the U.S. Postal Service with email communications.  As a result, it is strongly recommended that students check their email accounts daily.  The consequences of not checking email are the same as those for not checking a U.S. Postal mailbox.  Some of these consequences include missing payment deadlines, missing registration deadlines, missing immunization deadlines, missing out on opportunities for financial aid, and missing requirements and deadlines for graduation.

Students are responsible for the consequences of not reading university-related communications sent to their email account.  Students have the responsibility to recognize that certain communications may be time-critical.  Errors in forwarding email to a personal email address or failure to read emails regularly are not acceptable reasons for missing university deadlines.

Students have the responsibility to clean their email accounts and avoid emails being rejected due to limited space in their account.

Privacy Rights of Students in Education Records

The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (20 U.S.C. 1232g) and regulations adopted thereunder (34 C.F.R. 99) set out requirements designed to protect students’ privacy in their records maintained by the campus. The statute and regulations govern access to certain student records maintained by the campus and the release of such records. The law provides that the campus must give students access to most records directly related to the student, and must also provide opportunity for a hearing to challenge the records if the student claims they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. The right to a hearing under this law does not include any right to challenge the appropriateness of a grade determined by the instructor. The law generally requires the institution to receive a student’s written consent before releasing personally identifiable data about the student. The institution has adopted a set of policies and procedures governing implementation of the statute and the regulations. Copies of these policies and procedures may be obtained at the office of the vice president for student services. Among the types of information included in the campus statement of policies and procedures are:

  1. the types of student records maintained and the information they contain;
  2. the official responsible for maintaining each type of record;
  3. the location of access lists indicating persons requesting or receiving information from the record;
  4. policies for reviewing and expunging records;
  5. student access right to their records;
  6. the procedures for challenging the content of student records;
  7. the cost to be charged for reproducing copies of records, and
  8. the right of the student to file a complaint with the Department of Education.

The Department of Education has established an office and review board to investigate complaints and adjudicate violations. The designated office is:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-5920.

The campus is authorized under the Act to release “directory information” concerning students. “Directory information” may include the student’s name, address, telephone listing, electronic mail address, photograph, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, grade level, enrollment status, degrees, honors, and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. The above-designated information is subject to release by the campus at any time unless the campus has received prior written objection from the student specifying what information the student requests not be released. Written objections should be sent to the office of the vice president for student services.

The campus is authorized to provide access to student records to campus officials and employees who have legitimate educational interests in such access. These persons have responsibilities in the campus’s academic, administrative or service functions and have reason for accessing student records associated with their campus or other related academic responsibilities. Student records may also be disclosed to other persons or organizations under certain conditions (e.g., as part of the accreditation or program evaluation; in response to a court order or subpoena; in connection with financial aid; or to other institutions to which the student is transferring)..

Student Conduct

Title 5, California Code of Regulations, § 41301. Standards for Student Conduct

Campus Community Values

The University is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy living and learning environment for students, faculty, and staff. Each member of the campus community should choose behaviors that contribute toward this end. Students are expected to be good citizens and to engage in responsible behaviors that reflect well upon their university, to be civil to one another and to others in the campus community, and contribute positively to student and university life.

Grounds for Student Discipline

Student behavior that is not consistent with the Student Conduct Code is addressed through an educational process that is designed to promote safety and good citizenship and, when necessary, impose appropriate consequences. The following are the grounds upon which student discipline can be based:

  1. Dishonesty, including:
    1. Cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty that are intended to gain unfair academic advantage.
    2. Furnishing false information to a University official, faculty member, or campus office.
    3. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of a University document, key, or identification instrument.
    4. Misrepresenting one’s self to be an authorized agent of the University or one of its auxiliaries.
  2. Unauthorized entry into, presence in, use of, or misuse of University property.
  3. Willful, material and substantial disruption or obstruction of a University-related activity, or any on-campus activity.
  4. Participating in an activity that substantially and materially disrupts the normal operations of the University, or infringes on the rights of members of the University community.
  5. Willful, material and substantial obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or other traffic, on or leading to campus property or an off-campus University related activity.
  6. Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene behavior at a University related activity, or directed toward a member of the University community.
  7. Conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person within or related to the University community, including physical abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, or sexual misconduct.
  8. Hazing or conspiracy to haze. Hazing is defined as any method of initiation or pre-initiation into a student organization or student body, whether or not the organization or body is officially recognized by an educational institution, which is likely to cause serious bodily injury to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution in this state (Penal Code 245.6), and in addition, any act likely to cause physical harm, personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm, to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution. The term “hazing” does not include customary athletic events or school sanctioned events. Neither the express or implied consent of a victim of hazing, nor the lack of active participation in a particular hazing incident is a defense. Apathy or acquiescence in the presence of hazing is not a neutral act, and is also a violation of this section.
  9. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of illegal drugs or drug- related paraphernalia, (except as expressly permitted by law and University regulations) or the misuse of legal pharmaceutical drugs.
  10. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of alcoholic beverages (except as expressly permitted by law and University regulations), or public intoxication while on campus or at a University related activity.
  11. Theft of property or services from the University community, or misappropriation of University resources.
  12. Unauthorized destruction or damage to University property or other property in the University community.
  13. Possession or misuse of firearms or guns, replicas, ammunition, explosives, fireworks, knives, other weapons, or dangerous chemicals (without the prior authorization of the campus president) on campus or at a University related activity.
  14. Unauthorized recording, dissemination, or publication of academic presentations (including handwritten notes) for a commercial purpose.
  15. Misuse of computer facilities or resources, including:
    1. Unauthorized entry into a file, for any purpose.
    2. Unauthorized transfer of a file.
    3. Use of another’s identification or password.
    4. Use of computing facilities, campus network, or other resources to interfere with the work of another member of the University community.
    5. Use of computing facilities and resources to send obscene or intimidating and abusive messages.
    6. Use of computing facilities and resources to interfere with normal University operations.
    7. Use of computing facilities and resources in violation of copyright laws.
    8. Violation of a campus computer use policy.
  16. Violation of any published University policy, rule, regulation or presidential order.
  17. Failure to comply with directions or interference with, any University official or any public safety officer while acting in the performance of his/her duties.
  18. Any act chargeable as a violation of a federal, state, or local law that poses a substantial threat to the safety or well-being of members of the University community, to property within the University community or poses a significant threat of disruption or interference with University operations.
  19. Violation of the Student Conduct Procedures, including:
    1. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information related to a student discipline matter.
    2. Disruption or interference with the orderly progress of a student discipline proceeding.
    3. Initiation of a student discipline proceeding in bad faith.
    4. Attempting to discourage another from participating in the student discipline matter.
    5. Attempting to influence the impartiality of any participant in a student discipline matter.
    6. Verbal or physical harassment or intimidation of any participant in a student discipline matter.
    7. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under a student discipline proceeding.
  20. Encouraging, permitting, or assisting another to do any act that could subject him or her to discipline.

Procedures for Enforcing This Code

The Chancellor shall adopt procedures to ensure students are afforded appropriate notice and an opportunity to be heard before the University imposes any sanction for a violation of the Student Conduct Code.

Application of This Code

Sanctions for the conduct listed above can be imposed on applicants, enrolled students, students between academic terms, graduates awaiting degrees, and students who withdraw from school while a disciplinary matter is pending. Conduct that threatens the safety or security of the campus community, or substantially disrupts the functions or operation of the University is within the jurisdiction of this Article regardless of whether it occurs on or off campus. Nothing in this Code may conflict with Education Code Section 66301 that prohibits disciplinary action against students based on behavior protected by the First Amendment.

Title 5, California Code of Regulations, § 41302.  Disposition of Fees: Campus Emergency; Interim Suspension.

The President of the campus may place on probation, suspend, or expel a student for one or more of the causes enumerated in Section 41301. No fees or tuition paid by or for such student for the semester, quarter, or summer session in which he or she is suspended or expelled shall be refunded. If the student is readmitted before the close of the semester, quarter, or summer session in which he or she is suspended, no additional tuition or fees shall be required of the student on account of the suspension.

During periods of campus emergency, as determined by the President of the individual campus, the President may, after consultation with the Chancellor, place into immediate effect any emergency regulations, procedures, and other measures deemed necessary or appropriate to meet the emergency, safeguard persons and property, and maintain educational activities.

The President may immediately impose an interim suspension in all cases in which there is reasonable cause to believe that such an immediate suspension is required in order to protect lives or property and to insure the maintenance of order. A student so placed on interim suspension shall be given prompt notice of charges and the opportunity for a hearing within 10 days of the imposition of interim suspension. During the period of interim suspension, the student shall not, without prior written permission of the President or designated representative, enter any campus of the California State University other than to attend the hearing. Violation of any condition of interim suspension shall be grounds for expulsion.

TITLE IX & GENDER EQUITY office

The office of Title IX & Gender Equity oversees the Title IX responsibilities on campus, including the End Sexual Violence Training, which is mandatory for every student once per academic year. Title IX is government legislation from the Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights.

Notice of Non-Discrimination on the Basis of Gender or Sex

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of gender, which includes sex and gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation, in its education programs or activities. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and certain other federal and state laws, prohibit discrimination on the basis gender or sexual orientation in employment, as well as in all education programs and activities operated by the University (both on and off campus). The protection against discrimination on the basis of gender or sexual orientation includes sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, gender-based dating and domestic violence and stalking. The following persons have been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies:

Campus Title IX Coordinator

Cristina Martin, Director for Title IX & Gender Equity
Duties: receiving complaints against faculty, staff, administrators, students and Third Parties; monitoring and oversight of overall implementation of Title IX compliance, including coordination of training, education and communication.
California State University, San Bernardino
5500 University Parkway
Santos Manuel Student Union, 103-A
San Bernardino, CA 92407-2393
Email: titleix@csusb.edu or cristina.martin@csusb.edu
Website: http://titleix.csusb.edu
Phone: (909) 537-5669
Regular office hours: Monday-Friday, 8:00 AM-4:30 PM
Summer office hours: Monday-Thursday, 7:00 AM-5:30 AM (closed Fridays)

Campus Title IX Deputy Coordinator

Krysten Newbury, Assistant Director for Title IX & Gender Equity
Duties: assisting the Title IX Coordinator in addressing Title IX complaints, as well as training, education and communication.
California State University, San Bernardino
5500 University Parkway
Santos Manuel Student Union, 103-A
San Bernardino, CA 92407-2393
Email: titleix@csusb.edu or krysten.newbury@csusb.edu
Website: http://titleix.csusb.edu
Phone: (909) 537-5669
Regular office hours: Monday-Friday, 8:00 AM-4:30 PM
Summer office hours: Monday-Thursday, 7:00 AM-5:30 AM (closed Fridays)

The Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinator implement the CSU protocol regarding Title IX by: (1) upholding the university's obligation to respond to or investigate sexual misconduct, gender harassment and sexual violence; (2) following CSU policies and complaint procedures; (3) working with designated CSUSB personnel; (4) offering resources and remedies for victims; and (5) providing education, raising awareness and offering training for the campus at large.

A campus administrative investigation of complaints or allegations of sexual misconduct utilizes a variety of CSU Executive Orders Orders, revised June 23, 2015 (EO-1095EO-1096EO-1097EO-1098), and certain federal laws (The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (VAWA) and the Campus SaVE Act) and state laws (Senate Bill No. 967).

Any acts of criminal sexual activity and incidents of sexual violence, such as sexual assault, sexual coercion and dating or domestic violence should be reported immediately by dialing 9-1-1 or contacting University Police at (909) 537-7777. The Title IX Coordinator will work with the police on cases which are reported to them. A campus administrative investigation may occur concurrently with a criminal investigation. 

What to Report

All allegations of discrimination, harassment or retaliation based on sex, gender, gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation which are made against staff, faculty, students, applicants or other Third Parties associated with the campus. The Title IX Coordinator will discuss the situation and explain the campus process, including what complaint procedures are available. If you would like to submit a complaint, or a concern, go to our website and click on the "File a report here" button at the top of the page, or you may come to our office (Santos Manuel Student Union, Room 103-A) for a hard copy of the report form, or send an email to titleix@csusb.edu, or call us at (909) 537-5669.

For Employee or Third Party complaints regarding discrimination, harassment, retaliation, sexual misconduct, dating and domestic violence, and stalking allegations not on the basis of sex, please see Executive Order 1096 (revised 6-23-2015) and its Attachments, or contact César Portillo, Associate Vice President of Human Resources, Sierra Hall, Room 110, (909) 537-5138, or visit our website for additional information.

Check with our office first to ensure that your case is handled appropriately and that you are utilizing the correct complaint procedure. Additionally, if you have any questions, need clarification, need resources, on or off campus (listed below, as well as on our website), or are interested in upcoming events and trainings, please get in touch with us:

Other Assistance, Questions or Concerns

Campus Advocate

Marina Wood, Advocate Services
Counseling & Psychological Services, HC-165
California State University, San Bernardino
5500 University Parkway
San Bernardino, CA 92407-2393
Email: marina.wood@csusb.edu
Website: https://www.csusb.edu/survivor-advocacy-services
Phone: (909) 537-5040

University Police

University Police Department
California State University, San Bernardino
5500 University Parkway
San Bernardino, CA 92407
policerecords@csusb.edu (additional information & services)
9-1-1 Emergencies; Non-emergencies (909) 537-7777 (TDD available)

Local Police

San Bernardino Police Department
710 North “D” Street, San Bernardino, CA 92401
Phone: (909) 384-5742; Non-Emergency 24-Hour: (909) 383-5311

Palm Desert Police Department
73705 Gerald Ford Drive, Palm Desert, CA 92260
Phone: (760) 836-1600

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights

(800) 421-3481 or by email

  • If you wish to fill out a complaint form online with the OCR, you may do so here.

End Sexual Violence Training

All California State University, San Bernardino students are required to complete mandatory End Sexual Violence Training--one training per academic year. Federal and state laws and the CSU Chancellor’s Office Executive Orders mandate this yearly training for all students (including online students and employees who are also enrolled students).

Completing one of three options before a deadline each year (updated on our website, on the Training page) will ensure a smooth registration process for the following quarter. After the deadline, a Registration hold will be placed on the student’s account until the Training is completed. Choices include:

  1. Attend a qualifying Event --  for the current offerings and more information, visit our Events page or OrgSync (navigate to the Title IX & Gender Equity membership page). Look for the "Let's Get it Done" approval stamp of the events that qualify.  
  2. Attend a Bystander workshop --  for the current schedule and more information, visit the Bystander Intervention page.
  3. Complete the online training program, "Not Anymore" -- for login instructions and more information, visit the Not Anymore page. CSUSB has partnered with vendor, Student Success™, to launch a secure online option.

Status Link

There is a link in MyCoyote, in the Self Service section, to check the status for the End Sexual Violence Training for each academic year. Students can look under the Academic Year column and find the current year to review their record at any time. Verifying that the yearly mandatory training has been completed by the deadline (updated on our website, on the Training page) will ensure a smooth process for the following quarter's registration.

Additional Questions

Please visit our Common Questions page or email titleix@csusb.edu.

DISCRIMINATION, HARASSMENT AND RETALIATION

Race, Color, Ethnicity, National Origin, Age, Genetic Information, Religion and Veteran Status

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, national origin, age, genetic information, religion or veteran status in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the California Equity in Higher Education Act, prohibit such discrimination. César Portillo, Associate Vice President of Human Resources has been designated to coordinate the efforts of CSUSB to comply with all applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on these bases. Inquiries concerning compliance may be presented to this person at Human Resources, Sierra Hall, Room 110, (909) 537-5138. CSU Executive Order 1097, revised 6-23-2015, is the systemwide procedure for all complaints of discrimination, harassment or retaliation, sexual misconduct, dating and domestic violence, and stalking made by students against the CSU, a CSU employee, other CSU students or a Third Party. 

Disability

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, prohibit such discrimination. César Portillo, Associate Vice President of Human Resources, has been designated to coordinate the efforts of CSUSB to comply with all applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability. Inquiries concerning compliance may be presented to this person at Human Resources, Sierra Hall, Room 110, (909) 537-5138. CSU Executive Order 1097, revised 6-23-2015, is the systemwide procedure for all complaints of discrimination, harassment or retaliation, sexual misconduct, dating and domestic violence, and stalking made by students against the CSU, a CSU employee, other CSU students or a Third Party.

Sex/Gender/Gender Identity/Gender Expression/Sexual Orientation

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of gender, which includes sex and gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation in its programs and activities, including admission and access. Federal and state laws, including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, prohibit such discrimination. Cristina Martin, Director for Title IX and Gender Equity and Title IX Coordinator has been designated to coordinate the efforts of CSUSB to comply with all applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination on these bases. Inquiries concerning compliance may be presented to her at Title IX and Gender Equity, Santos Manuel Student Union, Room 103-A, (909) 537-5669. The California State University is committed to providing equal opportunities to male and female CSU students in all campus programs, including intercollegiate athletics (both on and off campus).

Requirements

Title IX requires the university to adopt and publish complaint procedures that provide for prompt and equitable resolution of sex discrimination complaints, including sexual harassment and violence, as well as provide training, education and preventive measures related to sex discrimination. CSU Executive Order 1097, revised 6-23-2015, is the systemwide procedure for all complaints of discrimination, harassment or retaliation, sexual misconduct, dating and domestic violence, and stalking made by students against the CSU, a CSU employee, other CSU students or a third party.

Except in the case of a privilege recognized under California law (examples of which include Evidence Code §§1014 (psychotherapist-patient); 1035.8 (sexual assault counselor-victim); and 1037.5 (domestic violence counselor-victim), any member of the University community who knows of or has reason to know of sexual discrimination allegations shall promptly inform the campus Title IX Coordinator. (See confidential reporting options outlined below.)

Regardless of whether an alleged victim of sexual discrimination ultimately files a complaint, if the campus knows or has reason to know about possible sexual discrimination, harassment or violence, it must review the matter to determine if an investigation is warranted. The campus must then take appropriate steps to eliminate any sex discrimination/harassment, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects.

Safety of the Campus Community is Primary

The university’s primary concern is the safety of its campus community members. The use of alcohol or drugs never makes the victim at fault for sexual discrimination, harassment or violence; therefore, victims should not be deterred from reporting incidents of sexual violence out of a concern that they might be disciplined for related violations of drug, alcohol or other university policies. Except in extreme circumstances, victims of sexual violence shall not be subject to discipline for related violations of the Student Conduct Code.

Information Regarding Campus, Criminal and Civil Consequences of Committing Acts of Sexual Violence

Individuals alleged to have committed sexual assault may face criminal prosecution by law enforcement and may incur penalties as a result of civil litigation. In addition, employees and students may face discipline at the university. Employees may face sanctions up to and including dismissal from employment, pursuant to established CSU policies and provisions of applicable collective bargaining unit agreements.

Students who are charged by the university with sexual discrimination, harassment or violence will be subject to discipline, pursuant to the California State University Student Conduct Procedures  (see CSU Executive Order 1098, revised 6-23-2015 (or any successor Executive Order) and will be subject to appropriate sanctions. In addition, during any investigation, the university may implement interim measures in order to maintain a safe and non-discriminatory educational environment. Such measures may include: immediate interim suspension from the university; a required move from university-owned or affiliated housing; adjustments to course schedule; and/or prohibition from contact with parties involved in the alleged incident.

Confidentiality and Sexual Violence, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking

The University encourages victims of sexual violence, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking (collectively Sexual Violence) to talk to someone about what happened – so they can get the support they need, and so the University can respond appropriately. Whether – and the extent to which – a University employee may agree to maintain confidentiality (and not disclose information to the Title IX Coordinator) depends on the employee’s position and responsibilities at the University. The following information is intended to make victims aware of the various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to them – so they can make informed choices about where to turn for help. The University strongly encourages victims to talk to someone identified in one or more of these groups. Certain University employees, listed below, are required by law to maintain near or complete confidentiality; talking to them is sometimes called a “privileged communication.” University law enforcement employees may maintain the victim’s identity as confidential, if requested by the victim, but will report the facts of the incident to the Title IX Coordinator, including the identity of the perpetrator. Most other University employees are required to report all details of a Sexual Violence incident (including the identities of both the victim and alleged perpetrator) to the Title IX Coordinator so the University can take immediate action to protect the victim, and take steps to correct and eliminate the cause of Sexual Violence. University Police, the Title IX Coordinator, University-employed physicians, professional counselors, sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates, and certain other University employees are required to explain to victims their rights and options with respect to confidentiality. 

Privileged and Confidential Communications

Physicians, Psychotherapists, Professional Counselors and Clergy – Physicians, psychotherapists, professional, licensed counselors, and clergy who work or volunteer on or off campus, and who provide medical or mental health treatment or counseling (including those who act in that role under their supervision) may not report any information about an incident of sexual violence to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator, without the victim’s consent. A victim can seek assistance and support from physicians, psychotherapists, professional, licensed counselors, and clergy without triggering a University investigation that could reveal the victim’s identity or the fact of the victim’s disclosure. However, see limited exceptions below regarding when health care practitioners must report to local law enforcement agencies. Health care practitioners should explain these limited exceptions to victims, if applicable.

Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Counselors and Advocates – Sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates who work or volunteer on or off campus in sexual assault centers, victim advocacy offices, women’s centers, and health centers (including all individuals who work or volunteer in these centers and offices, as well as non-professional counselors or advocates, and those who act in that role under their supervision) may talk to a victim without revealing any information about the victim and the incident of sexual violence to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator, without the victim’s consent. A victim can seek assistance and support from these counselors and advocates without triggering a University investigation that could reveal his/her identity or that a victim disclosed an incident to them. However, see limited exceptions below regarding when sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates must report to local law enforcement agencies. Counselors and advocates should explain these limited exceptions to victims, if applicable. 

The University will be unable to conduct an investigation into a particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against a perpetrator if a victim chooses to (1) speak only to a physician, professional counselor, clergy member, sexual assault counselor, domestic violence counselor or advocate; and (2) maintain complete confidentiality. Even so, these individuals will assist victims in receiving other necessary protection and support, such as victim advocacy, disability, medical/health or mental health services, or legal services, and will advise victims regarding their right to file a Title IX complaint with the University and a separate complaint with local or University police. If a victim insists on confidentiality, such professionals, counselors and advocates will likely not be able to assist the victim with: University academic support or accommodations; changes to University-based living or working schedules; or adjustments to course schedules. A victim who at first requests confidentiality may later decide to file a complaint with the University or report the incident to the police, and thus have the incident fully investigated. These counselors and advocates can provide victims with that assistance if requested by the victim. These counselors and advocates will also explain that Title IX includes protections against retaliation, and that the University will not only take steps to prevent retaliation when it knows or reasonably should know of possible retaliation, but will also take strong responsive action if it occurs.

EXCEPTIONS: Under California law, any health practitioner employed in a health facility, clinic, physician’s office, or local or state public health department or clinic is required to make a report to local law enforcement if he or she provides medical services for a physical condition to a patient/victim who he or she knows or reasonably suspects is suffering from (1) a wound or physical injury inflicted by a firearm; or (2) any wound or other physical injury inflicted upon a victim where the injury is the result of assaultive or abusive conduct (including Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, and Dating Violence). This exception does not apply to sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates. Health care practitioners should explain this limited exception to victims, if applicable.

Additionally, under California law, all professionals described above (physicians, psychotherapists, professional counselors, clergy, and sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates) are mandatory child abuse and neglect reporters, and are required to report incidents involving victims under 18 years of age to local law enforcement. These professionals will explain this limited exception to victims, if applicable.

Finally, some or all of these professionals may also have reporting obligations under California law to (1) local law enforcement in cases involving threats of immediate or imminent harm to self or others where disclosure of the information is necessary to prevent the threatened danger; or (2) to the court if compelled by court order or subpoena in a criminal proceeding related to the Sexual Violence incident. If applicable, these professionals will explain this limited exception to victims.

Reporting to University or Local Police

If a victim reports to local or University Police about sexual violence, the police are required to notify victims that their names will become a matter of public record unless confidentiality is requested. If a victim requests that his/her identity be kept confidential, his/her name will not become a matter of public record and the police will not report the victim’s identity to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator. University Police will, however, report the facts of the incident itself to the Title IX Coordinator being sure not to reveal to the Title IX Coordinator victim names/identities or compromise their own criminal investigation. The University is required by the federal Clery Act to report certain types of crimes (including certain sex offenses) in statistical reports. However, while the University will report the type of incident in the annual crime statistics report known as the Annual Security Report, victim names/identities will not be revealed.

Reporting to the Title IX Coordinator and Other University Employees

Most University employees have a duty to report sexual violence incidents when they are on notice of it. When a victim tells the Title IX Coordinator or another University employee about a sexual violence incident, the victim has the right to expect the University to take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate what happened and to resolve the matter promptly and equitably. In all cases, the University strongly encourages victims to report sexual violence directly to the campus Title IX Coordinator. As detailed above in the Privileged and Confidential Communications section of this policy, all University employees except physicians, licensed counselors, sexual assault counselors and advocates, must report to the Title IX Coordinator all relevant details about any sexual violence incidents of which they become aware. The University will need to determine what happened – and will need to know the names of the victim(s) and the perpetrator(s), any witnesses, and any other relevant facts, including the date, time and specific location of the incident.

To the extent possible, information reported to the Title IX Coordinator or other University employees will be shared only with individuals responsible for handling the University’s response to the incident. The University will protect the privacy of individuals involved in a sexual violence incident except as otherwise required by law or University policy. A Sexual Violence report may result in the gathering of extremely sensitive information about individuals in the campus community. While such information is considered confidential, University policy regarding access to public records and disclosure of personal information may require disclosure of certain information concerning a report of sexual violence. In such cases, efforts will be made to redact the records, as appropriate, in order to protect the victim’s identity and privacy and the privacy of other involved individuals. Except as detailed in the section on Privileged and Confidential Communications above, no University employee, including the Title IX Coordinator, should disclose the victim’s identity to the police without the victim’s consent or unless the victim has also reported the incident to the police.

If a victim requests of the Title IX Coordinator or another University employee that his/her identity remain completely confidential, the Title IX Coordinator will explain that the University cannot always honor that request and guarantee complete confidentiality. If a victim wishes to remain confidential or request that no investigation be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the University must weigh that request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, employees, and third parties, including the victim. Under those circumstances, the Title IX Coordinator will determine whether the victim’s request for complete confidentiality and/or no investigation can be honored under the facts and circumstances of the particular case, including whether the University has a legal obligation to report the incident, conduct an investigation or take other appropriate steps. Without information about a victim’s identity, the University’s ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the perpetrator may be severely limited. See CSU Executive Order 1095, revised 6-23-2015, for further details around confidential reporting, and other related matters.

For Any More Current Information

Please visit the Title IX & Gender Equity website.

Myths and Facts About Sexual Misconduct

Common Myths and Facts about the Causes of Sexual Misconduct 

1) Myth: Victims provoke Sexual Assaults when they dress provocatively or act in a promiscuous manner.

Fact: Rape and Sexual Assault are crimes of violence and control that stem from a person’s determination to exercise power over another. Neither provocative dress nor promiscuous behaviors are invitations for unwanted sexual activity. Forcing someone to engage in non-consensual sexual activity is Sexual Assault; regardless of the way that person dresses or acts. 

2) Myth: If a person goes to someone’s room or house or goes to a bar, s/he assumes the risk of Sexual Assault. If something happens later, s/he can’t claim that s/he was raped or sexually assaulted because s/he should have known not to go to those places. 

Fact: This “assumption of risk” wrongfully places the responsibility of the offender’s action with the victim. Even if a person went voluntarily to someone’s home or room and consented to engage in some sexual activity, it does not serve as blanket consent for all sexual activity. University policy defines Sexual Misconduct to include any sexual activity that is engaged in without Affirmative Consent. Affirmative Consent means informed, affirmative, voluntary, and mutual agreement to engage in sexual activity. Each person involved is responsible to ensure that they have the Affirmative Consent of the other participant(s). When in doubt if the person is comfortable with an elevated level of sexual activity, stop and ask. When someone says “no” or “stop,” that means “STOP!” Sexual activity forced upon another without valid consent is Sexual Assault. 

3) Myth: It is not Sexual Misconduct if it happens after drinking or taking drugs. 

Fact: Being under the influence of alcohol or drugs is not an invitation for sexual activity. A person under the influence does not cause others to assault her/him; others choose to take advantage of the situation and sexually assault her/him because s/he is in a vulnerable position. A person who is incapacitated due to the influence of alcohol or drugs is not able to consent to sexual activity. 

4) Myth: Most Sexual Assaults are committed by strangers. It’s not rape if the people involved know each other. 

Fact: Most Sexual Assaults and Rape are committed by someone the victim knows. A study of sexual victimization of college women showed that about 90% of victims knew the person who sexually victimized them. Most often, a boyfriend, ex-boyfriend, classmate, friend, acquaintance or co-worker sexually victimized the person. It is important to remember that Sexual Misconduct can occur in both heterosexual and same-gender relationships. 

5) Myth: Rape can be avoided if women avoid dark alleys or other “dangerous” places where strangers might be hiding or lurking. 

Fact: Rape and other Sexual Misconduct can occur at any time, in many places, to anyone. 

6) Myth: A person who has really been sexually assaulted will be hysterical. 

Fact: Victims of Sexual Assault exhibit a spectrum of responses to the assault which can include: calm, hysteria, withdrawal, anxiety, anger, apathy, denial, and shock. Being sexually assaulted is a very traumatic experience. Reaction to the assault and the length of time needed to process through the experience vary with each person. There is no “right way” to react to being sexually assaulted. Assumptions about the way a victim “should act” may be detrimental to the victim because each victim copes in different ways. 

7) Myth: All victims will report the crime immediately to the police. If they do not report it or delay in reporting it, then they must have changed their minds after it happened, wanted revenge or didn’t want to look like they were sexually active. 

Fact: There are many reasons why a victim may not report the assault to the police or campus officials. It is not easy to talk about being sexually assaulted and can feel very shameful. The experience of retelling what happened may cause the person to relive the trauma. Another reason for delaying a report or not making a report is the fear of retaliation by the offender. There is also the fear of being blamed, not being believed and being required to go through judicial proceedings. Just because a person does not report the incident does not mean it did not happen. 

8) Myth: Only young, pretty women are assaulted. 

Fact: The belief that only young, pretty women are sexually assaulted stems from the myth that Sexual Misconduct is based on sex and physical attraction. Sexual Assault is a crime of power and control. Offenders often choose people whom they perceive as most vulnerable to attack or over whom they believe they can assert power. Men and boys are also sexually assaulted, as well as persons with disabilities. Assumptions about the “typical” victim might lead others not to report the assault because they do not fit the stereotypical victim profile. 

9) Myth: It’s only Rape if the victim puts up a fight and resists. 

Fact: Many states do not require the victim to resist in order to charge the offender with Rape or Sexual Assault. Those who do not resist may feel if they do so, they will anger their attacker, resulting in more severe injury. Many assault experts say that victims should trust their instincts and intuition and do what they believe will most likely keep them alive. Not fighting or resisting an attack does not equal consent. 

10) Myth: Someone can only be sexually assaulted if a weapon was involved. 

Fact: In many cases of Sexual Assault, a weapon is not involved. The offender often uses physical strength, physical violence, intimidation, threats or a combination of these tactics to overpower the victim. Although the presence of a weapon while committing the assault may result in a higher penalty or criminal charge, the absence of a weapon does not mean that the offender cannot be held criminally responsible for a Sexual Assault. 

What You Can Do To Help Stop Sexual Misconduct 

• Sexual contact requires mutual and Affirmative Consent. An incapacitated person (for example, a person under the influence of drugs or alcohol) may be incapable of giving consent. Whether an intoxicated person (as a result of using alcohol or other drugs) is incapacitated depends on the extent to which the alcohol or other drugs impact the person’s decision-making capacity, awareness of consequences, and ability to make fully informed judgments. 
• No one deserves to be sexually assaulted, stalked or victimized in any way. 
• Don’t engage in any behavior that may be considered Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking or any other form of Sexual Misconduct or violence. 
• Never use force, coercion, threats, alcohol or other drugs to engage in sexual activity. 
• Take responsibility for your actions. 
• Avoid alcohol and other drugs. 
• Remember “no” means “No!” and “stop” means “Stop!” 
• Report incidents of violence (including coercion) to law enforcement and campus authorities.
• Discuss Sexual Misconduct, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking with friends—speak out against non-consensual sex or violence and clear up misconceptions. 
• Don’t mistake submission or silence for Affirmative Consent. 

What You Can Do To Help Minimize Your Risk of Becoming a Victim

 • Be aware. Does your partner: Threaten to hurt you or your children? Say it’s your fault if he or she hits you and then promises it won’t happen again (but it does)? Put you down in public? Force you to have sex when you don’t want to? Follow you? Send you unwanted messages and gifts? 
• Be assertive. Speak up. 
• Stay sober and watch out for dates and/or anyone who tries to get you drunk or high. 
• Clearly communicate limits to partners, friends, and acquaintances. 
• Never leave a party with someone you don’t know well and trust. 
• Trust your feelings; if it feels wrong, it probably is. 
• Learn all you can and talk with your friends. Help them stay safe. 
• Report incidents of violence to law enforcement and campus authorities. 

What You Can Do If You Are a Victim, in General 

• Go to a safe place as soon as possible. 
• Preserve evidence. 
• Report the incident to University Police or local law enforcement. 
• Report the incident to your campus Title IX Coordinator. 
• Call/visit the campus Sexual Assault Victim’s Advocate 
• Call a Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault or Stalking hotline. 
• Call a friend or family member for help. 
• Know that you are not at fault. You did not cause the abuse to occur and you are not responsible for someone else’s violent behavior.

Sexual Misconduct - Risk Reduction Tips 

All sexual activity between members of the CSU community must be based on Affirmative Consent.2 Engaging in any sexual activity without first obtaining Affirmative Consent to the specific activity is Sexual Misconduct, whether or not the conduct violates any civil or criminal law. 

Sexual activity includes, but is not limited to, kissing, touching intimate body parts, fondling, intercourse, penetration of any body part, and oral sex. It also includes any unwelcome physical sexual acts, such as unwelcome sexual touching, Sexual Assault, Sexual Battery, Rape, and Dating Violence. When based on Gender, Domestic Violence and Stalking also constitute Sexual Misconduct. Sexual Misconduct may include using physical force, violence, threat, or intimidation, ignoring the objections of the other person, causing the other person’s intoxication or incapacitation through the use of drugs or alcohol, or taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation (including voluntary intoxication) to engage in sexual activity. Men as well as women can be victims of these forms of Sexual Misconduct. Sexual activity with a minor is never consensual when a person is under 18 years old, because a minor is considered incapable of giving legal consent due to age. 

“What can I do in order to help reduce my risk of being a victim of Sexual Misconduct?” 

Risk reduction tips can often take a victim-blaming tone, even unintentionally. With no intention to victim-blame and with recognition that only those who commit Sexual Misconduct are responsible for those actions, these suggestions may nevertheless help you to reduce your risk of experiencing a non-consensual sexual act: 

• If you have limits, make them known as early as possible. 
• Tell a sexual aggressor “NO” clearly and firmly. 
• Try to remove yourself from the physical presence of a sexual aggressor. 
• Find someone nearby and ask for help. 
• Take affirmative responsibility for your alcohol intake/drug use and acknowledge that alcohol/drugs lower your sexual inhibitions and may make you vulnerable to someone who views a drunk or high person as a sexual opportunity. 
• Take care of your friends and ask that they take care of you. A real friend will challenge you if you are about to make a mistake. Respect them when they do. 
In an emergency, call 9-1-1

“What can I do in order to help reduce my risk of being an initiator of Sexual Misconduct?” 

If you find yourself in the position of being the initiator of sexual behavior, you owe sexual respect to your potential partner. These suggestions may help you to reduce your risk of being accused of sexual misconduct: 

• Clearly communicate your intentions to your sexual partner and give them a chance to clearly relate their intentions to you. 
• Understand and respect personal boundaries. 
• DON’T MAKE ASSUMPTIONS about consent, about someone’s sexual availability, about whether they are attracted to you, about how far you can go or about whether they are physically and/or mentally able to consent. If there are any questions or ambiguity then you DO NOT have consent. 
• Mixed messages from your partner are a clear indication that you should stop, defuse any sexual tension and communicate better. You may be misreading them. They may not have figured out how far they want to go with you yet. You must respect the timeline for sexual behaviors with which they are comfortable. 
• Don’t take advantage of someone’s drunkenness or drugged state, even if they did it to themselves. Incapacitation means a person is unable to give valid consent. 
• Realize that your potential partner could be intimidated by you, or fearful. You may have a power advantage simply because of your gender or size. Don’t abuse that power. 
• Understand that consent to some form of sexual behavior does not automatically imply consent to any other forms of sexual behavior. 
• Silence and passivity cannot be interpreted as an indication of consent. Read your potential partner carefully, paying attention to verbal and non-verbal communication and body language. 

Rape, Acquaintance Rape, Sexual Assault, Sexual Battery

Rape is a form of Sexual Misconduct and is non-consensual sexual intercourse that may also involve the use of threat of force, violence, or immediate and unlawful bodily injury or threats of future retaliation and duress. Any sexual penetration, however slight, is sufficient to constitute Rape. Sexual acts including intercourse are considered non-consensual when a person is incapable of giving consent because s/he is incapacitated from alcohol and/or drugs, is under 18 years old, or if a mental disorder or developmental or physical Disability renders a person incapable of giving consent. The Respondent’s relationship to the person (such as family member, spouse, friend, acquaintance or stranger) is not determinative.3 (See complete definition of Affirmative Consent below.)

Acquaintance Rape is a form of Sexual Misconduct committed by an individual known to the victim. This includes a person the victim may have just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website.

Sexual Assault is a form of Sexual Misconduct and is an attempt, coupled with the ability, to commit a violent injury on the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex.4

Sexual Battery is a form of Sexual Misconduct and is any willful and unlawful use of force or violence upon the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex as well as touching an intimate part of another person against that person’s will and for the purpose of sexual arousal, gratification, or abuse.5

In order for a sexual act to be considered Rape or Sexual Assault, the act must be non-consensual.

Crimes of a sexual nature may be reported to campus or local law enforcement in addition to being reported administratively on campus to the Title IX Coordinator. Both men and women can be victims of Rape or Sexual Assault.

Affirmative Consent

Affirmative Consent means an informed, affirmative, conscious, voluntary, and mutual agreement to engage in sexual activity. It is the responsibility of each person involved in the sexual activity to ensure that he or she has the Affirmative Consent of the other participant(s) to engage in the sexual activity. Lack of protest or resistance does not mean Affirmative Consent, nor does silence mean Affirmative Consent. Affirmative Consent must be voluntary, and given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation.

The existence of a dating or social relationship between those involved, or the fact of past sexual activities between them, should never by itself be assumed to be an indicator of Affirmative Consent. A request for someone to use a condom or birth control does not, in and of itself, constitute Affirmative Consent.

Affirmative Consent can be withdrawn or revoked. Consent to one form of sexual activity (or one sexual act) does not constitute consent to other forms of sexual activity. Consent given to sexual activity on one occasion does not constitute consent on another occasion. There must always be mutual and Affirmative Consent to engage in sexual activity. Consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual activity and can be revoked at any time, including after penetration. Once consent is withdrawn or revoked, the sexual activity must stop immediately.

Affirmative Consent cannot be given by a person who is incapacitated. A person is unable to consent when s/he is asleep, unconscious, or is incapacitated due to the influence of drugs, alcohol or medication so that s/he could not understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual activity. A person is incapacitated if s/he lacks the physical and/or mental ability to make informed, rational decisions.

Whether an intoxicated person (as a result of using alcohol or other drugs) is incapacitated depends on the extent to which the alcohol or other drugs impact the person’s decision-making ability, awareness of consequences, and ability to make informed judgments. A person’s own intoxication or incapacitation from drugs or alcohol does not diminish that person’s responsibility to obtain Affirmative Consent before engaging in sexual activity.

A person with a medical or mental disability may also lack the capacity to give consent.

Sexual activity with a minor (a person under 18 years old) is never consensual, because a minor is considered incapable of giving consent due to age.

It shall not be a valid excuse that a person affirmatively consented to the sexual activity if the Respondent knew or reasonably should have known that the person was unable to consent to the sexual activity under any of the following circumstances:

• The person was asleep or unconscious;
• The person was incapacitated due to the influence of drugs, alcohol, or medication, so that the person could not understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual activity;
• The person was unable to communicate due to a mental or physical condition.

It shall not be a valid excuse to alleged lack of Affirmative Consent that the Respondent believed that the person consented to the sexual activity under either of the following circumstances:

• The Respondent’s belief in Affirmative Consent arose from the intoxication or recklessness of the Respondent;
• The Respondent did not take reasonable steps, in the circumstances known to the Respondent at the time, to ascertain whether the person affirmatively consented to the sexual activity.

What is Dating Violence or Domestic Violence?

Domestic Violence is abuse committed against someone who is a current or former spouse; current or former cohabitant; someone with whom the abuser has a child; someone with whom the abuser has or had a dating or engagement relationship; or a person similarly situated under California domestic or family violence law. Cohabitant means two unrelated persons living together for a substantial period of time, resulting in some permanency of relationship. It does not include roommates who do not have a romantic, intimate, or sexual relationship. Factors that may determine whether persons are cohabiting include, but are not limited to, (1) sexual relations between the parties while sharing the same living quarters, (2) sharing of income or expenses, (3) joint use or ownership of property, (4) whether the parties hold themselves out as husband and wife, (5) the continuity of the relationship, and (6) the length of the relationship. For purposes of this definition, “abuse” means intentionally or recklessly causing or attempting to cause bodily injury or placing another person in reasonable apprehension of imminent serious bodily injury to himself or herself, or another. Abuse does not include non-physical, emotional distress or injury.6

Dating Violence is abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social or dating relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.7 This may include someone the victim just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website. For purposes of this definition, “abuse” means intentionally or recklessly causing or attempting to cause bodily injury or placing another person in reasonable apprehension of imminent serious bodily injury to himself or herself, or another. Abuse does not include non-physical, emotional distress or injury.

Types of Dating/Domestic Violence That Constitute Sexual Misconduct

There usually is a pattern or a repeated cycle of Dating Violence, starting with the first instance of abuse.

General Pattern of Behavior:

Tension Building: Relationship begins to get strained or tense between partners.
Explosion: Outburst that includes verbal, emotional, or physical abuse.
Honeymoon: Apologies where the abuser tries to re-connect with his/her partner by shifting the blame onto someone or something else.

What Dating/Domestic Violence Looks Like

Physical Abuse: any use of physical force with the intent to cause injury (i.e. grabbing in a way to inflict pain, hitting, shoving, strangling, kicking)
Sexual Abuse: any action that impacts the partner’s ability to control his/her sexual activity or the circumstance in which sexual activity occurs, including Rape, coercion or restricting access to birth control.

Warnings or Signs of Potential Dating/Domestic Violence

• Any actions used for the intent of gaining power and control over a person. Checks my cell phone or email without my permission.
• Monitors where I’m going, who I’m going with, what I’m doing.
• Repeatedly says or does things to make me feel inadequate or inferior to him/her.
• Extreme jealously or insecurity.
• Isolates me from my friends and family.
• Explosive temper.
• Mood swings.
• Assumes control over my access to financial resources.
• Tells me what to do.
• Possessiveness.
• Physically hurts me in any way.

Stalking

Stalking means a repeated course of conduct directed at a specific person (when based on gender or sex) that places that person in reasonable fear for his/her or others’ safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress.8

Stalking is a pattern of behavior that makes you feel afraid, nervous, harassed or in danger. It is when someone repeatedly contacts you, follows you, sends you things, talks to you when you don't want them to or threatens you. Stalking behaviors can include:

• Damaging your property.
• Knowing your schedule.
• Showing up at places you go.
• Sending mail, e-mail, texts and pictures.
• Creating a website about you.
• Sending gifts.
• Stealing things that belong to you.
• Calling you repeatedly.
• Any other actions that the stalker takes to contact, harass, track or frighten you.

You can be stalked by someone you know casually, a current boyfriend or girlfriend, someone you dated in the past or a stranger. Getting notes and gifts at your home, on your car or other places might seem sweet and harmless to other people, but if you don't want the gifts, phone calls, messages, letters or e-mails, it doesn't feel sweet or harmless. It can be scary and frustrating.

Sometimes people stalk their boyfriends or girlfriends while they're dating. They check up on them, text or call them all the time, expect instant responses, follow them, use GPS to secretly monitor them and generally keep track of them, even when they haven't made plans to be together. These Stalking behaviors can be part of an abusive relationship. If this is happening to you or someone you know, you should talk to a trusted person.

Stalking is a crime and can be dangerous. California Penal Code section 646.9, in part, states, “Any person who willfully, maliciously and repeatedly follows or willfully and maliciously harasses another person and who makes a credible threat with the intent to place that person in reasonable fear for his or her safety, or the safety of his or her immediate family is guilty of the crime of stalking…..”

How You Can Help Yourself

Think about ways you can be safer. This means thinking about what to do, where to go for help and who to call ahead of time:

• Where can you go for help?
• Who can you call?
• Who will help you?
• How will you escape a violent situation?

Other Things You Can Do

In an emergency, call 911 or University Police or the local police department.
• Let friends or family members know when you are afraid or need help.
• Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you find a way to get out of a bad situation.
• Avoid isolated areas.
• Avoid putting headphones in both ears so you can be more aware of your surroundings.
• Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, remove yourself.
• Vary your routine, your driving routes and where you park your car.
• When you go out, tell someone where you are going and when you'll be back. Memorize the phone numbers of people to contact or places to go in an emergency.
• Don’t load yourself down with packages or bags restricting your movement.
• Keep your cell phone handy; check to see that you have reception and that your cell phone is charged, but, then pay attention to your surroundings instead of the phone.
• Have money for a cab or other transportation.
• Save notes, letters or other items that the stalker send to you. Keep a record of all contact that the stalker has with you; these items will be very useful in an investigation.

How You Can Help Someone Else

If you know someone who is being stalked, you can:

• Encourage your friend to seek help.
• Be a good listener.
• Offer your support.
• Ask how you can help.
• Educate yourself about stalking.
• Avoid any confrontations with the stalker; this could be dangerous for you and your friend.

1 Key capitalized terms are defined below in bold.
2 See definition of Affirmative Consent below. 
3 See Cal. Penal Code §§ 261, 263.
4 See Cal. Penal Code § 240.
5 See Cal. Penal Code § 242
6 See Cal. Penal Code § 13700(b) and Cal. Family Code § 6211.
7 See Cal. Penal Code § 13700(b).
8 See Cal. Penal Code § 646.9.

Additional Resources

(Note: All links can also be accessed directly from Title IX & Gender Equity, under Resources.) 

Campus Services

•    Counseling and Psychological Services, 24-Hour Hotline 909.537.5040; for life threatening situations, call 911.
•    Student Health Center, 909.537.5241.
•    Women’s Resource Center, 909.537-7203.

Off-Campus Services

•    San Bernardino Sexual Assault Services, 24-Hour Crisis Hotlines 800.656.4673 or 909.885.8884; Main Office: 444 North Arrowhead Avenue, Suite 101, San Bernardino, CA 92401-1221, 909.885.8884; Coachella Valley/Indio 760.568.9071; Morongo Basin/Yucca Valley 760.369.3353; Redlands 909.335.8777; Victorville 760.952.0041; Yucaipa 909.790.9374.
•    Alternatives to Domestic Violence (ADV), Crisis Line—Riverside city & out of the county 951.683.0829, remainder of Riverside county 800.339.SAFE (7233); domestic violence help; protective order assistance; counseling; outreach; shelter.
•    House of Ruth, 24-Hour Crisis Hotline 877.988.5559; individual/group counseling; phone support; legal advocate; shelter for women and children; domestic violence counseling; food; English/Spanish.
•    Rape Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN), 800.656.HOPE (4673).
•    Riverside Area Rape Crisis Center (RARCC), 24-Hour Hotline 951.686.RAPE (7273) & Toll-Free 866.RAPE (7273); 1845 Chicago Avenue, Suite A, Riverside, CA 92507.
•    Option House, 24-Hour Hotline 909.381.3471; temporary domestic violence women’s shelters; support/outreach; free support groups, crisis education and self-defense; assistance with protective order paperwork; English/Spanish.
•    Doves Outreach of Big Bear Valley, 909.866.1546; 24-Hour Hotline 800.851.7601; provides women and families domestic violence shelter; individual counseling; support groups (parenting, anger management, women’s writing, etc.); legal assistance; protective order help; programs and services for male victims. 
•    A Better Way Domestic Violence Shelter and Outreach, Victor Valley, 24-Hour Hotline 760.955.8723; Toll-Free 888.949.5770 & 866.228.2059; 26-bed shelter (90-day maximum stay), TRO (temporary restraining order); outreach programs, opportunity and education support groups; Spanish. 
•    Shelter from the Storm, Inc., Coachella Valley, 24-Hour Crisis Lines 800.775.6055, 760.328.SAFE (7233); emergency shelter; transitional housing; counseling center; legal clinic; teen dating.
•    California Coalition Against Sexual Assault, 916.446.2520; 1215 K. Street, Suite 1850, Sacramento, CA 95814.
•    Domestic and Family Violence, Office for Victims of Crimes/Office of Justice Programs.
•    National Institute of Justice: Intimate Partner Violence.
•    National Domestic Violence Hotline, 800.799.SAFE (7233); TTY For the Deaf 800.787.3224.
•    U.S. Department of Justice: Office of Violence Against Women (on-line chat available).
•    U.S. Department of Justice: Defending Childhood.
•    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Intimate Partner Violence.
•    CSUSB’s sexual violence prevention and education statement.
•    CSUSB's Policies website, for students.
•    U.S. Department of Education, Regional office: Office for Civil Rights, 50 Beale Street, Suite 7200, San Francisco, CA 94105; (415) 486-5555; TDD (877) 521-2172.
•    U.S. Department of Education, National office: Office for Civil Rights, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-1100; (800) 872-5327.
•    Know Your Rights About Title IX.