Master of Arts in Social Sciences and Globalization

Requirements (46 units)

Program Code: SSGM

The objective of the M.A. in Social Sciences is to provide students with a survey of the concepts and ideas social scientists study with emphasis placed upon the domestic and international impact of globalization. While the program provides course work in the breadth of the social sciences, its emphasis is on history, political science, economics, sociology, anthropology, and geography. This program is especially attractive to those pursuing a career in or seeking advancement in secondary school and community college teaching in the social sciences. Those interested in work in other types of educational and social science related fields may also benefit from this program.

Admission to the M.A. Program

In addition to the general requirements of the university, specific requirements for admission to classified status are:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in a social science discipline or in social science itself, or another baccalaureate degree with course work that satisfies the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences that the student has received adequate preparation to undertake the program;
  2. A cumulative undergraduate grade point average of at least 2.5 overall and at least 3.0 ("B") in the major;
  3. Completion of the graduate entrance writing requirement;
  4. A brief 1 to 2 page statement of purpose (not to exceed 1,000 words), describing the applicant's preparation for graduate study and academic and professional goals, to be submitted to the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences;
  5. A writing sample (at least 10 pages but not to exceed 25 pages) that demonstrates the applicant's ability to write analytical prose, to construct a reasoned argument based upon evidence, and to create a context for assessing the significance of what has been presented. Writing sample should demonstrate preparation for the applicant's proposed field of study;
  6. Three letters of recommendation, with at least two from former professors. Letters should come directly from the recommenders or be included in a placement file. It is the applicant's responsibility to determine if letters have been received.

Applicants who meet the general requirements of the university for admission to graduate study but do not meet the additional requirements listed above may be admitted to the university in the unclassified postbaccalaureate status. Unclassified postbaccalaureate students may enroll, when space permits, in elective graduate courses in the program but not the required graduate proseminars. An unclassified postbaccalaureate student should consult with the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences to determine what steps would be necessary to advance to classified status.

Advancement to Candidacy

In order to be formally advanced to candidacy, a student must have:

  1. Achieved classified status;
  2. Secured a graduate advisor to supervise the course of study;
  3. Completed, with the approval of the advisor, at least 12 quarter units of graduate course work at this university and achieved a minimum grade point average of 3.0 ("B") in those courses;
  4. Filed an approved program plan, which must have the approval of the student's advisor and the coordinator of the program.

Requirements for Graduation

  1. Completion of a minimum of 46 quarter units of acceptable graduate-level work, with at least 33 quarter units completed in residence at this university;
  2. A grade of at least "B" in all Proseminars, and a grade point average of at least 3.0 ("B") in all courses taken as part of the program;
  3. To provide a breadth of content in this graduate program, a 300- or 400-level course may be used to satisfy a program requirement with the expectation that coursework is increased to satisfy the rigors of graduate work.  In addition, students are allowed to take a 400- or 500-level course from any University department with the approval of the program coordinator;
  4. Successful completion of the comprehensive examination, or a thesis or project;
  5. In addition to completion of the graduate writing requirement, classified students enrolled in the M.A. in Social Sciences must satisfy the program's writing requirements by:
    1. Successful completion of the M.A. in Social Sciences with a grade point average of "B" or better in Social Sciences core courses requiring students to write in a manner appropriate to the relevant social science disciplines; and
    2. Successful completion of the Social Science Comprehensive Examination (SSCI 697) requiring acceptable writing skills, or preparation of an acceptable graduate thesis (SSCI 699);
  6. At least 23 units of 600-level courses;
  7. Any additional requirements not cited above and listed in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements.

Comprehensive examination: Students who choose the comprehensive examination option must take that examination no earlier than in the second to the last quarter of program course work. These students must enroll in SSCI 697. Students with less than a 3.0 grade point average in the program will not be permitted to take the examination. The comprehensive examination committee for each candidate will consist of the program coordinator and the student's advisor. The comprehensive examination will have two components. The first will be a general examination that covers the areas of social science treated in the course requirements with a special focus on globalization. The second will be a specific field and focus on the student’s specialization. The examination will be graded pass/fail, and candidates failing the examination may take it a second time within one year. If a second examination is needed, the student, coordinator and advisor should discuss what actions may be necessary to remedy the student's shortcomings. No student will be permitted to take the comprehensive examination more than twice.

Thesis or Project option: A student selecting the thesis or project option must complete a thesis or project that is approved by his or her faculty committee. The thesis or project must reflect original work and show a level of competence appropriate for a master's degree. The faculty committee shall consist of two or three faculty members, including the student's advisor, mutually agreed upon by the student and faculty. By mutual agreement between the student and advisor, an additional member may be added to the committee. At least one member of the thesis committee must also be affiliated with the Graduate faculty. The student must enroll in SSCI 699, Thesis or Cumulative Project, in the quarter when completion of the thesis is anticipated.

Degree Requirements (46 units)

Required Courses (26-28)
ANTH 600Proseminar in Anthropology4
ECON 600Proseminar in Economics4
GEOG 600Proseminar in Geography4
HIST 600Proseminar in History4
PSCI 610Proseminar in Political Science4
SOC 600Proseminar in Sociology4
SSCI 697Comprehensive Examination2-4
or SSCI 699 Graduate Project or Thesis
Electives (20)
Either SSCI 600 and 16 units of electives from one of the following tracks (eight units must be at the 500-level or above) or 20 units of electives from one of the following tracks (eight units must be at the 500-level or above).20
Total Units46-48

Track A (Disciplinary Concentration)

  1. Twenty units chosen from one of the following six disciplines.
  • Anthropology
  • Economics
  • Geography
  • History
  • Political Science
  • Sociology
Twenty units chosen from one of the following disciplines:20
Anthropology
Economics
Geography
History
Political Science
Sociology
Eight of these units can be Independent Study chosen from:
ANTH 595A-E
Independent Study
ANTH 659A-E
Independent Graduate Study
ECON 595A-E
Independent Study
ECON 695A-E
Independent Graduate Study in Economics
GEOG 595A-E
Independent Study
HIST 595A-E
Independent Study
PSCI 595A-E
Independent Study
SOC 595A-E
Independent Study
SSCI 695A-E
Directed Graduate Studies
Total Units20

Independent Study courses will involve research which builds on the methods and theories of the student's disciplinary concentration and contribute to the student's thesis/special field.

All coursework must be chosen in consultation with the disciplinary advisor (members of the affiliated faculty representing the corresponding disciplines). All electives must be 300-level courses or above, and eight units of the elective courses must be at the 500-level or above.

Track B (Regional Focus)

  1. Twenty units of elective coursework must consist of courses related to a geographical region of emphasis. Eight units can consist of an independent study. Independent Study courses will involve research which focuses on the student's regional emphasis and contribute to the student's thesis/special field.

All coursework must be chosen in consultation with the coordinator of the program. All electives must be 300-level courses or above, and eight units of the elective courses must be at the 500-level or above.

Electives for Regional focus

  1. Twenty units of elective coursework on a particular topic chosen from the following (based on approval of the graduate coordinator):
American Studies
ANTH 305North American Prehistory4
ANTH 315Archaeology of the Southwest4
ANTH 312Historical Archaeology4
ANTH 323Native North American Art4
ANTH 351Indians of North America4
ANTH 352Indians of the Southwest4
ANTH 365Asian American Cultures4
ECON 421Economic History of the United States4
GEOG 322United States and Mexico Border Issues4
GEOG 323North America4
GEOG 440Understanding the City4
HIST 340African-American History, 1620-18654
HIST 341African-American History, 1865-Present4
HIST 344Women in U.S. History, 1620-18654
HIST 345Women in U.S. History, 1865-Present4
HIST 346Women in the Black Freedom Movement4
HIST 350The American Colonies, 1607-17834
HIST 351The Evolution of American Democracy, 1783-18404
HIST 354Civil War and Reconstruction4
HIST 356The United States, 1877-19174
HIST 357The United States, 1917-19454
HIST 358United States in World War II4
HIST 359United States History, Cold War Era4
HIST 540Constitutional History of the United States4
HIST 541U.S. Citizenship and the Law4
HIST 560History of the American West4
HIST 565Immigration and Ethnic American History4
PSCI 314American Political Thought4
PSCI 320The Legislative Process4
PSCI 325American Foreign Policy4
PSCI 326Political Parties and Interest Groups4
PSCI 328Judicial Process4
PSCI 330State and Local Politics4
PSCI 352A-EMinority Politics 4
PSCI 410American Constitutional Law4
PSCI 411The Bill of Rights4
PSCI 412Civil Rights4
PSCI 431The American Presidency4
PSCI 528Formulation of Public Policy4
PSCI 525Constitutional Interpretation4
PSCI 535Seminar in Constitutional Law4
SOC 330Social Gerontology4
SOC 336Black Women and Feminism4
SOC 341Marriage and Family Among Blacks4
SOC 342The Chicano Family4
SOC 425Asian Americans: Origin and Ethnicity4
SOC 441Black Social Stratification4
SOC 442Chicano Social Stratification4
SOC 525Indian Nations and Native America4
SSCI 515Model United Nations4
SSCI 590Seminar in the Social Sciences4
African Studies
ANTH 302African Archaeology4
ANTH 357African Societies4
HIST 385Africa to 15004
HIST 386Africa 1500 to 18704
HIST 387Africa 1870 to Present4
HIST 388The Rise, Decline and Legacy of Apartheid South Africa4
HIST 389Images of Africa4
HIST 450History of Southern Africa4
HIST 451The History of Health and Medicine in Africa4
PSCI 301African Politics4
PSCI 590Seminar in International Relations4
SSCI 515Model United Nations4
SSCI 590Seminar in the Social Sciences4
Asian Studies
ANTH 362Asian Cultures and Societies4
ANTH 365Asian American Cultures4
HIST 426Ancient and Early Imperial China4
HIST 428Medieval China4
HIST 431Modern China II, 1911-19494
HIST 432Modern China III, 1949-Present4
HIST 435World War II in the Pacific4
HIST 440Modern Japanese History4
PSCI 305East Asian Politics4
PSCI 540Seminar in Comparative Politics4
European Studies
HIST 305Ancient and Medieval Europe4
HIST 306Early Modern Europe, the Renaissance to 18154
HIST 307Modern Europe, 1815 to the Present4
HIST 400Early Medieval Europe4
HIST 401High Medieval Europe4
HIST 402Renaissance and Reformation4
HIST 403The Age of Absolutism and Enlightenment4
HIST 405Nazi Germany and the Holocaust4
HIST 406European Intellectual History4
HIST 409Twentieth Century Europe4
HIST 503Europe Since 19454
HIST 535Studies in European National History4
PSCI 300Western Political Systems4
PSCI 304East European Political Systems4
PSCI 540Seminar in Comparative Politics4
PSCI 590Seminar in International Relations4
SSCI 515Model United Nations4
SSCI 590Seminar in the Social Sciences4
Latin America
ANTH 306Aztecs, Maya and their Predecessors4
ANTH 307Incas and their Predecessors4
ANTH 324Pre-Columbian Art4
ANTH 354Cultures of Mexico and Central America4
ANTH 356Cultures of South America4
ECON 540Political Economy of Latin America4
GEOG 322United States and Mexico Border Issues4
GEOG 621Seminar in the Geography of Latin America4
HIST 390History of Modern Mexico4
HIST 465Modern Central America4
HIST 466Foreign Relations of Latin America4
HIST 467Latin American History Through Film4
HIST 469Colonial Latin America4
HIST 470Modern Latin America4
SSCI 304Contemporary Latin America4
SSCI 515Model United Nations4
SSCI 590Seminar in the Social Sciences4
SOC 590Seminar in Sociology4
Middle Eastern Studies
ANTH 303Prehistory of the Middle East and Europe4
ANTH 358Peoples of the Middle East4
HIST 383Classical Islamic Civilization4
HIST 384Modern Middle East4
HIST 485Arab-Israeli Conflict4
HIST 486Modern Iran4
HIST 487Topics in Modern Middle Eastern History4
HIST 491Nationalism and Conflict in the Middle East4
HIST 492U.S. Media and the Middle East4
HIST 493Iran-U.S. Relations4
HIST 495Politics of Oil4
PSCI 308Government and Politics of the Middle East4
PSCI 540Seminar in Comparative Politics4
PSCI 540Seminar in Comparative Politics4
SSCI 515Model United Nations4
SSCI 516Model Arab League4
SSCI 590Seminar in the Social Sciences4

Track C (Topical Focus)

  1. Twenty units of elective coursework must consist of courses related to a topical focus. Eight units can consist of an independent study. Independent study courses will involve research which focuses on the student’s topical focus and contribute to the student’s thesis/special field.
    All coursework must be chosen in consultation with the program coordinator. All electives must be 300-level courses or above, and eight units of the elective courses must be at the 500-level or above.

Electives for Topical Focus

Twenty units of elective coursework on a particular topic chosen from the following (based on approval of the Graduate Coordinator).20
Historical Archaeology
Historical Archaeology
Archival Practices
Archival Practices
Introduction to Cultural Resource Management
Introduction to Cultural Resource Management
Cross-Cultural Child-Rearing Practices
Anthropology of Human Development
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Aging
Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Anthropology and Film
Globalization and Culture
Magic, Religion and Science
Gender and Language
Language and Culture
Colonial and Postcolonial Anthropology
Political Economy of Women: Money, Sex, Race, and Power
Political Economy of Poverty and Discrimination
Political Economy of Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered People
Economics of the Environment
International Economics
Multinational Corporations
Global Economy
History of Economic Thought
Social Economics
Economics of Crime
International Economic Issues
Transportation Issues and Development
Geography of Social Issues
Geography of the Developing World
Geography of the Developed World
Military Geography
Conservation and Natural Resources
Weather and Climate
Climate Change
Landscape Analysis
Urban Planning and Land Development
Geography of Economic Activity
Historical Archaeology
Historical Archaeology
Historic Preservation
Topics in Public History
Topics in Oral History
American History Through Film
History of California
Museum Management
Historical Documentaries
The History of Madness
The Rise, Decline and Legacy of Apartheid South Africa
Images of Africa
The History of Health and Medicine in Africa
Latin American History Through Film
History of Christianity I
History of Christianity II
Politics of Oil
Internship in History (may be repeated once for up to 8 units)
Foreign Relations of the United States
Internship in History
Advanced Archival Practices
Advanced Cultural Resource Management
Advanced Public History
Advanced Oral History
Advanced Exhibit Design
Western Political Systems
Developing Political Systems
Foundations of Modern Political Thought
Modern Political Thought
Post Modern Political Thought
Political Parties and Interest Groups
Judicial Process
State and Local Politics
The Politics of Environment
PSCI 352A-E
Minority Politics:
International Politics
National Security Policy
International Law
International Organization
War and Politics
Constitutional Interpretation
Studies in Political Theory
Seminar in Comparative Politics
Seminar in International Relations
Seminar in Government
Analysis of International Terrorism
International Relations Theory
Sociology of the Family
Sociology of Family Violence
Criminology
Juvenile Offender
Deviant Behavior
Medical Sociology
Sociology of Mental Illness
Punishment and Corrections
Social Psychology
Sociology of Mass Communication
Sociology of Religion
Sociology of Race and Ethnicity
Sociology of Social Welfare
Urban Sociology
Political Sociology
Community Organization
Group Dynamics
Social Class
Sociology of Gender
White Collar Crime
Sociology of Education
Indigenous Peoples
Seminar in Sociology
Model United Nations
Model Arab League
Seminar in the Social Sciences