Department of Management

Jack Brown Hall, Room 461
(909) 537-5731 Department of Management

The university offers concentrations in management within the Bachelor of Arts in Administration and the Master of Business Administration. Concentrations are offered under the B.A.in Administration in ManagementEntrepreneurship, Human Resource Management, and International Business. Management courses are offered in support of these programs. Further information is available from the Department of Management.

The Management Department encourages its majors to take part in the California State University's International Programs. This program provides opportunity for CSUSB students to study in a foreign country and earn full resident credit for these studies. Participation in this program will enhance the student's ability to study and work in an international business setting.

For students in management, International Programs are particularly useful in an increasingly competitive global environment where knowledge of diverse cultures, beliefs and societies is essential for success in business. By joining the California State University's International Programs students will have taken a major step in preparing themselves for rewarding careers in the business world of the future.

Management Courses

MGMT 100. Introduction to Business and Public Administration. 4 Units.

Introduction to the administrative process. Strategies to achieve success in business and public careers. Includes the development of administrative theories and practices and provides an overview of the functional areas of business and public administration. Examines the questions of ethics, small business management and the global aspects of administration.

MGMT 230. Business Law. 4 Units.

An introduction to statutory and common law developments impacting commercial transactions. Emphasizes principles of contract law and sale of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code. Additional topics include business organizations, commercial paper and secured transactions.

MGMT 302. Management and Organizational Behavior. 4 Units.

Introduction to management as it affects operations and the behavior of people in relation to the functional fields of administration. Selected behavioral concepts analyzed with respect to applications in management. Offered as MGMT 302 and PSYC 302. Students may not receive credit for both.

MGMT 306. Expository Writing for Administration. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: satisfaction of the GE written communication (A1) requirement and a minimum of 90 quarter (60 semester) units of college credit
(GE=F1)
Writing related to business and public administration including documented research reports, summaries and analytical papers. Revision and rewriting will be required. Course fulfills the graduation requirement in writing proficiency. May not be counted for fulfilling concentration requirements for any degree program offered by the College of Business and Public Administration. No more than one of the expository writing courses (EDUC 306, ENG 306, HUM 306, MGMT 306, NSCI 306, SSCI 306) may be taken for credit. Students who have received a grade of no credit in any combination of the expository writing courses two or more times must meet with the 306 coordinator or designee to design a developmental writing plan as a condition for enrolling for a third quarter. All students must obtain junior status at the time of registration or their course request will be cancelled. Formerly MGMT 495. Graded A, B, C/no credit.

MGMT 330. Legal Environment of Business. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 230
Study of the legal system; nature and source of law as applied to business activity; statutes and significant cases involving business policies; effect of public policies on private enterprise system.

MGMT 335. Business, Ethics, and Society. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: the upper-division writing requirement
Social and legal factors influencing business; social expectations for ethical conduct and corporate social responsibility (CSR); role of business in alleviating societies problems; problems and issues of current concern regarding women and minorities in management; business and society in a global context.

MGMT 350. Administrative Communications. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: the upper-division writing requirement
Introduction to communication theory. Concepts, analysis and methods of improvement for interpersonal communication, communication within organizations and communication between organizations and their external environments.

MGMT 402. Studies in Organizational Behavior. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302
Review and presentation of selected areas of behavioral science research and its application to management practices. Selected subjects may include: motivation, communication, change and leadership.

MGMT 405. Managing Across Borders. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302
Identification of the diverse factors and actors that shape the global business environment. Comparative analysis of management practices in various cultures with emphasis on sociocultural, political and economic influences. Balancing of local responsiveness and global integration, and decision-making skills for managing across borders are emphasized.

MGMT 406. International Business Law. 4 Units.

Comparison and contrast of the various dimensions of international business transactions. General legal framework in which international business is conducted; competing national laws and courts systems with respect to a variety of typical international business problems; international institutions and prospects for internationalizing the legal treatment of transnational business operations.

MGMT 407. Comparative Management Systems of the Americas. 4 Units.

Comparative analysis of private and public sector organizations and corresponding management systems currently operating throughout the Americas. Examination of the structure and management systems of private and public sector organizations in different American countries and the trade patterns among these nations.

MGMT 408. Managing in Europe. 4 Units.

Identification of the diverse factors and actors that shape the business environment in one or more nations in Europe. Comparative analysis of management practices and leadership challenges and approaches for navigating sociocultural, political and eocnomic contexts.

MGMT 451. Organization and Management Theory. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302
Development and analysis of organization and management theory. Comparative analysis seeking patterns and systematic explanation of differences among organizations. Dynamics of interaction between organizations and environment.

MGMT 452. Leading Effectively and Ethically. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302
Relevant theories and concepts for leading individuals and groups effectively and for developing ethical awareness to respond appropriately to ethical dilemmas.

MGMT 459. Work Group Management. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302
Examination of the dynamics of task-oriented groups in American and international environments, utilizing both conceptual and experiential learning.

MGMT 490. Strategic Management. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: completion of the upper-division administration core courses (one course may be taken concurrently), the upper-division writing requirement, and senior standing
This college capstone course develops an overall general manager's perspective of strategic management and competitive strategy integrating knowledge from accounting, finance, information and decision sciences, management, marketing, public policy, and supply chain management. Coverage includes competitive strategy for global, national and regional/local business and managerial concerns regarding social and environmental issues.

MGMT 515. Business Consulting. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: senior status, consent of instructor and college
Supervised consulting assignments designed to provide meaningful business assistance to businesses.

MGMT 520. Legal Regulation of Intellectual Property. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 230 and 330
Analysis of federal, state and international law on intellectual property and technology, including principles of contract law, intellectual law, taxation law, tort law, anti-trust law and criminal law with respect to technology and intellectual property.

MGMT 526. Global Entrepreneurship. 5 Units.

Entrepreneurial process in a global context as it relates to recognizing ideas, marshaling resources, developing networks and creating the strategy for a new cross-border venture.

MGMT 575. Internship. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: senior standing preferred; consent of instructor and the departments internship coordinator
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 575 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit.

MGMT 590B. Seminar in Management. 2 Units.

Intensive study of some phase of management to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

MGMT 590C. Seminar in Management. 3 Units.

Intensive study of some phase of management to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

MGMT 590D. Seminar in Management. 4 Units.

Intensive study of some phase of management to be developed by the instructor. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

MGMT 595B. Independent Study. 2 Units.

Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Marketing (1-5 units).

MGMT 595D. Independent Study. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: a minimum overall grade point average of 3.0, consent of instructor and approval by the department of a written project/proposal submitted to the appropriate department in the College of Business and Public Administration on a standard application filed in advance of the quarter in which the course is to be taken
Special topics involving library and/or field research. A total of 10 units in any College of Business and Public Administration 595 may be applied toward graduation. Marketing (1-5 units).

MGMT 601. Organization Theory and Behavior. 4 Units.

A critical analysis of theories for viewing organizations and an examination of the common models for understanding human behavior, including executive behavior, within the constraints of a complex social system.

MGMT 626. International New Venture Development. 4 Units.

Entrepreneurial process in a global context examining the complexity of international entrepreneurship as it relates to recognizing ideas, marshaling resources, developing networks and creating the strategy for a new venture.

MGMT 641. Managing Human Resources. 4 Units.

Analysis of specific areas and problems in the administration of human resource systems and policies. Topics include employment law, job analysis, recruitment, selection, performance appraisal, and compensation administration.

MGMT 642. Communication and Interpersonal Processes. 4 Units.

Study of interpersonal processes, communication, and conflict as they relate to organizational efficiency and effectiveness, as well as a consideration of the organization as a communication system.

MGMT 644. Industrial Relations. 4 Units.

Analysis of industrial relations systems in major industries, collective bargaining institutions, processes, legal environment and problems.

MGMT 645. Negotiation and Bargaining. 4 Units.

Theory and practice of negotiation and bargaining including the analytical skills necessary to prepare, plan, and present advocacy positions, anticipate opposing positions, envision and achieve optimal resolutions of disputes. Course participants will simulate, negotiate, debrief, discuss, and evaluate negotiation problems, strategies and tactics.

MGMT 650. Managing and Leading Global Business. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 601 or consent of instructor
Management and leadership of organizations in global environments. Emphasis on economic, political and sociocultural influences.

MGMT 655. Leadership for Modern Organizations. 4 Units.

An overview of leadership emphasizing an understanding and analysis of the research on classical and contemporary theories in the field of organizational leadership.

MGMT 660. Managing Teams in the Workplace. 4 Units.

Overview to understand the dynamics present and best practices to manage high performance work teams. Topics include methods for self awareness, interviewing, stress management, supportive communication, problem solving, influencing and motivating others, managing conflict, empowering, delegating, and team building. Formerly a topic under MGMT 690.

MGMT 675. Internship. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: consent of instructor and department's internship coordinator
Supervised work and study in private or public organizations. May be repeated once for credit. A total of two College of Business and Public Administration 675 courses may be applied toward graduation. Graded credit/no credit.

MGMT 685. Corporate Strategy in a Global Economy. 4 Units.

Long-term strategy of the business organization in the context of the global economy from the perspective of the General Manager who has overall responsibility for the performance of the firm. Course integrates corporate social responsibility in all the topics covered, including strategy formulation and implementation, industry competitive analysis, core competencies and key success factors, diversification and strategic alliances, among other.

MGMT 690. Advanced Topics in Management. 4 Units.

Intensive study of an advanced topic in management. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

MGMT 695. Graduate Project. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy, written approval of the student's graduate project committee and approval of the graduate (MBA) director
Independent graduate research for the management concentration or the concentration in entrepreneurship. Project will be under the direction of a faculty member.

MGMT 698A. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. 1 Unit.

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in 698 each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll in 698 through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. 698 is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

MGMT 698B. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. 2 Units.

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in 698 each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll in 698 through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. 698 is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

MGMT 698C. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. 3 Units.

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in 698 each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll in 698 through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. 698 is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

MGMT 698D. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in 698 each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll in 698 through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. 698 is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

MGMT 698E. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. 5 Units.

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in 698 each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll in 698 through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. 698 is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

MGMT 698F. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. 6 Units.

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in 698 each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll in 698 through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. 698 is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

MGMT 698Z. Continuous Enrollment for Graduate Candidacy Standing. 0 Units.

Prerequisites: advancement to candidacy and approval of program graduate coordinator or, if an interdisciplinary studies major, consent of the Dean of Graduate Studies
Independent study leading to completion of requirements (other than course work) for the master's degree. To retain classified standing in the master's program, a student must enroll in 698 each quarter until the project or thesis is accepted or the comprehensive examination passed. Students who enroll in 698 through the university have full use of all university facilities. See Culminating Experience: Exam, Thesis, or Project in Graduate Degree and Program Requirements section of the Bulletin of Courses. 698 is a variable unit course, see fee schedule in the Financial Information section of the Bulletin of Courses. Earned units are not degree-applicable nor will they qualify for financial aid.

MGMT 998. Baccalaureate Reflective Essay. 0 Units.

Prerequisites: completion of or concurrent enrollment in all courses in student's area of concentration
Submission of a reflective essay based on departmental guidelines.

Courses

ENTR 100. Exploring Entrepreneurship. 4 Units.

What is entrepreneurship? Who are entrepreneurs? How does one become an entrepreneur? Course examines the key questions encountered by individuals considering the path of business ownership. Focus on examining the history and role of entrepreneurs in the economy, characteristics of entrepreneurs, career paths of entrepreneurship and one's personal potential as an entrepreneur.

ENTR 442. Small Business Management. 4 Units.

Managerial considerations for the small business entrepreneur. Acquisitions, location, legal considerations, finances, taxation, labor relations and other topics. Formerly MGMT 442.

ENTR 541. Commercializing Entrepreneurial Innovation. 4 Units.

Examines the process of commercializing innovations and emerging technologies in entrepreneurial driven companies. Focus on understanding the strategy, tactics and behaviors necessary to manage the transition from basic development stages to commercial venture, examining the role of innovation assessment, intellectual property protection, technology transfer and licensing. Formerly MGMT 541.

ENTR 543. New Venture Opportunity Analysis. 4 Units.

Process of defining and identifying the difference between ideas and opportunities including the role of the entrepreneur, ideas, pattern recognition, and the evaluation and screening process that leads to successful commercialization of business concepts and ideas. Formerly MGMT 543.

ENTR 544. New Venture Development. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: ENTR 543
Introduction to the process of developing a new venture concept. Examines key issues in new venture creation, including the role of the entrepreneur in transitioning ideas to business opportunities. Special emphasis on developing a rapid opportunity analysis, identifying a sustainable business model, and business planning. Formerly MGMT 544.

ENTR 545. New Venture Resource Requirements. 4 Units.

Strategies and techniques employed by entrepreneurs to identify and access critical resources. Special emphasis on marshalling internal and external resources such as advisors, board of directors, and social networks. Formerly MGMT 545.

ENTR 547. Managing a Growing Business. 4 Units.

Study of the basic strategy and tactics to manage growing enterprises while still maintaining an entrepreneurial spirit. Examines the role of management decision making, management control systems, short- and long-term planning, and entrepreneurship in managing growing companies. Formerly MGMT 547.

ENTR 549. Launching the Entrepreneurial Venture. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: ENTR 543 and ENTR 544
Process and methods involved in starting and growing new enterprises with emphasis on the attributes of entrepreneurs, entrepreneurial careers and positioning an enterprise for sustainable growth. Formerly MGMT 549.

ENTR 598. Reflective Essay. 0 Units.

Prerequisites: completion of or concurrent enrollment in all courses in the Entrepreneurship concentration or Entrepreneurship minor
Submission of a reflective essay based on specified program guidelines. Graded credit/no credit.

ENTR 620. Business Law for Entrepreneurs. 4 Units.

Critical analysis of the impact of administrative law and policy on entrepreneurial decision-making and strategy. Integrates legal, political, regulatory and ethical issues encountered by entrepreneurs. Formerly MGMT 620.

ENTR 621. Entrepreneurship and New Ventures. 4 Units.

Study of the entrepreneurial process. Focus on the characteristics and mindset of entrepreneurs, ideation and innovation, startup models, analyzing emerging opportunities, resource creativity and managerial challenges for new and growing companies. Formerly MGMT 621.

ENTR 623. Piloting the New Venture. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: ENTR 621
Study of the exploration process for new venture concepts. Focus on examining the tools and processes involved in developing a new venture, including formulation of a sustainable business model, preforming a comprehensive feasibility analysis, and concept testing. Formerly MGMT 623.

ENTR 625. New Venture Planning and Strategy. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: ENTR 621 and ENTR 623
Study of the policies, strategies, and planning processes involved in entrepreneurship. Integrates important technical and innovative considerations with traditional managerial theories to establish a modern approach to the development of business plans, strategies and policies for new ventures. Formerly MGMT 625.

ENTR 998. Reflective Essay. 0 Units.

Prerequisites: completion of or concurrent enrollment in all courses in the Entrepreneurship focus area courses
Submission of a reflective essay based on specified program guidelines. Graded credit/no credit.

Courses

HRM 455. Human Resources Management. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: MGMT 302 or PSYC 302, and the upper-division writing requirement
Policies related to human resources; human resources planning, employee selection and development, performance appraisal, compensation, relationships with unionized employees, collective bargaining. Formerly MGMT 455.

HRM 456. Developing an Effective Workforce. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: HRM 455 or PSYC 355
Theory and practice of employee selection, training, and performance appraisal. Formerly MGMT 456.

HRM 457. Industrial and Labor Relations. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: HRM 455 or PSYC 355
Analysis of historical, political, legal, economic and managerial forces which lead to the development of labor unions and collective bargaining. Focus on legal rights of employees and managerial rights of employer. Involves case law and bargaining simulation. Formerly MGMT 457.

HRM 458. Fair Employment Practices. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: HRM 455 or PSYC 355
An evaluation of fair employment practices in employment. Course emphasizes antidiscriminatory legislation and its application to employer-employee relationships. Formerly MGMT 458.

HRM 460. Compensation and Performance. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: HRM 455 or PSYC 355
An examination of reward systems, both financial and non-financial, in the business enterprise. Financial rewards include the process of job analysis, job evaluation, and the market surveys with an emphasis on the firm's competitive strategy. Benefit administration and compensation systems for special groups are also presented. Various systems of performance management are studied, including individual employee performance appraisals. Formerly MGMT 460.

HRM 470. Strategic Human Resource Management. 4 Units.

Prerequisites: HRM 455 or PSYC 355 and HRM 456 and HRM 458
Capstone course integrating human resource management materials acquired through the required concentration courses and addressing the strategic role of HR professionals in organizations. Formerly MGMT 470.

Current Faculty

Helena Addae, Associate Professor
B.A. 1980,Ph.D. 2003, Concordia University
M.B.A. 1983, McGill University, Montreal
Melissa Bakeman, Lecturer
B.A. 1996, M.A. 2001, California State University, San Bernardino
Lisa Bartle, Librarian
B.A. 1990, University of California, Santa Barbara
M.A. 1993, University of California, Riverside
M.L.I.S. 1997, University of California, Los Angeles
Breena Coates, Professor
M.A. 1993 University of Pittsburgh
Ph.D. 1999, University of Pittsburgh
Foad Derakhshan, Professor
B.S. 1973, Tehran College of Business Sciences
M.B.A. 1976, Ph.D. 1979, Louisiana State University
Donald A. Drost, Professor
B.A. 1975, M.B.A. 1977, California State University, Fullerton
Ph.D. 1984, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Patrick Flaherty, Lecturer
MBA 1985, California State University, San Bernardino
Vipin Gupta, Professor, Associate Dean
B.A. 1988, Shri Ram College of Commerce, Delhi University
M.B.A. 1990, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad
Ph.D. 1998, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
Matthew Habich, Lecturer
M.S. 1995, Golden Gate University
Yongseok Jang, Assistant Professor
B.A. 2001, Inha University
M.A. 2004, University of Florida
Ph.D. 2009, University of Florida
Rachel Keener, Student Services Professional
Psy.D. 2006, Fuller Graduate School of Psychology
Paul Kirwan, Lecturer
B.A. 1998, M.S.C. 2001, University College Cork
Ph.D. 2008, University of Twente, the Netherlands
Stacy Magedanz, Librarian
B.A. 1990, M.A. 1992, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
M.A. 1996, University of Missouri-Columbia
Gary D. Patterson, Professor
B.A. 1973, B.S. 1973, California State University, Fresno
M.A. 1976, Indiana University, Bloomington
J.D. 1983, Western State University, Fullerton
Kathie Pelletier, Professor
B.A. 1982, San Diego State University
M.S. 1998, California State University, San Bernardino
Ph.D. 2009, Claremont Graduate University, CA
Shelly Pope
B.S. 1981, M.S. 1989, California State University, San Bernardino
Ranfeng Qiu, Associate Professor
B.S. 2000, University of International Business and Economics
M.A. 2005, Indiana University at Bloomington
Ph.D. 2010, Rutgers University, New Jersey
Barbara A. Quarton, Librarian
B.A. 1977, University of San Diego
M.L.I.S. 1999, San Jose State University
Ernesto M. Reza, Professor
B.A. 1977, Pitzer College
M.A. 1982, Ph.D. 1992, University of Michigan
Cynthia Schreihans, Lecturer
B.A. 1998, M.B.A. 2000, California State University, San Bernardino
Ph.D. 2006, University of La Verne
Craig Seal, Professor, Assistant Dean
B.A. 1991, Santa Clara University
M.A. 1995, Boston College
Ph.D. 2007, George Washington University
Michael Stull, Professor, Chair
B.A. 1988, M.B.A. 1989, California State University, San Bernardino
EDM 2005, Case Western Reserve University
Jeff Andreas Tan, Student Services Professional
B.A. 1996, University of California, San Diego
M.S. 2004, Ph.D. 2005, University of Missouri
Jing Zhang, Assistant Professor
B.A. 2009, Shandong Normal University
M.A. 2014, University of Houston
Ph.D. 2016, University of Houston

Emeriti

William Aguilar, Librarian
Buckley B. Barrett, Librarian
Joe Bas, Professor
G. R. Bassiry, Professor
Marty Bloomberg, Librarian
Sheldon E. Bockman, Professor
Aubrey Bonnett
David Bourquin, Librarian
Karen Bowerman
Michael R. Burgess, Librarian
John S. Chaney, Professor
John A. Conley
James D. Crum
Sue Greenfeld, Professor
Lee W. Hanson
Beverly L. Hendricks
Martha Kazlo
Jeanne King, Professor
Joan Kritzberg, Professor
Steven M. Levy, Professor
Janice Loutzenhiser, Associate Professor
Patrick McInturff, Professor
Clark Molstad, Professor
Art Nelson, Librarian
Lloyd E. Peake, Professor
Johnnie Ann Ralph
James Rogers, Professor
Elisabeth Ryland, Professor
Christine Schalow, Professor
Ed Schneiderhan, Student Services Professional
John Tibbals, Librarian

Special Appointments

Jocelyn Hua-Chen Chang, Instructor
D.M.A. 2009, University of Southern California
Mary Dropkin, Instructor
B.M. 1973, University of Southern California
Stuart C. Green, Instructor
B.M. 1994, M.M. 1997, University of Redlands
Audrey Lamprey, Instructor
B.M. 1967, Eastman School of Music
M.M. 1970 Bowling Green State University
Gary Long, Instructor
B.M. 1995, University of Oregon
M.M. 1997, Juilliard School of Music
Ana Maria Maldonado, Instructor
B.M. 1971, Texas Tech University
M.M. 1975, University of Southern California
Philip Rehfeldt, Instructor
BM Ed. 1961, University of Arizona
M.M. 1962, Mount St. Mary's College
Rebecca Tomlinson, Instructor
B.M. 1996, University of Redlands
M.M. 2000, D.M.A. 2003, University of California, Los Angeles
Lisa Geering Tomoff, Instructor
B.M., Indiana University School of Music
Scott Vance, Instructor
B.M. 1975, M.M. 1981, University of Redlands